Box art for 127 Hours

127 Hours

action & adventure, drama, thrillers


From Danny Boyle, the Academy Award®-winning director of 2008's Best Picture, Slumdog Millionaire, comes 127 HOURS. 127 HOURS is the true story of mountain climber Aron Ralston's (James Franco) remarkable adventure to save himself.

Rotten Tomatoes® scores

  • Critic Score
    93%
  • Audience Score
    85%

common sense

PAUSE for kids age 17
Violence
5 out of 5
Consumerism
3 out of 5
Drinking, drugs, & smoking
1 out of 5
Language
4 out of 5
Positive messages
3 out of 5
Positive role models
3 out of 5
Sex
3 out of 5

True story of trapped hiker is intense, powerful, gruesome.

what parents need to know

Parents need to know that this intense drama from the director of Slumdog Millionaire is based on a true story about a hiker trapped in the bottom of a canyon for more than five days, his arm pinned between a boulder and the canyon wall. Although there's some very gruesome self-inflicted violence as the main character (who's played by James Franco) attempts to free himself -- some audience members reportedly passed out at preview screenings -- ultimately 127 Hours is a positive, life-affirming story about overcoming incredible odds. Those who have the stomach for the bloody parts can also expect some heavy language (not all that surprising, considering the movie's circumstances), and flashback scenes with drinking and sexual situations. There are also notable beverage product placements (Gatorade, Coke, Perrier, etc.) as the main character gets thirsty and dreams of something to drink.

what families can talk about

  • Families can talk about the movie's gory parts. Were they absolutely necessary to tell the story? How did seeing those scenes make you feel? Could you feel the pain the character was going through? How was this accomplished?
  • Did Aron do everything possible to free himself? What could he have done differently? What would you have done differently?
  • Are movies based on real lives/true stories more interesting than those that are pure fiction?

movie reviews from Rotten Tomatoes®

  • Tomatometer®

    93%
    reviews counted: 0
    see all 127 Hours reviews
  • Audience

    85%

Audience Reviews

4 stars

How exciting can you make a movie where someone's stuck between a rock and a rock for 90 minutes (or 127 hours, as it happened in 2002) and everyone heard about how the case ended? If you're Danny Boyle, you have a lot of ideas. Starting out like a Gatorade or hiking commercial, the film soon after gets very reduced and has to rely entirely on James Franco in his strongest performance to date. While Boyle still adds a few fun camera and stoy-telling gimmicks to spice up the endless time Aron is stuck, the film works thanks to Franco's outstanding acting. The last 10 minutes, with Sigur Ros' "Festival" playing, are absolutely brilliant and leave you deeply touched. A great example of what human beings are capable of and why stories about the will to live always beat "stones fall, everyone dies" endings. Impressing both from the background story and the acting point of view.

- ironclad1609, Thursday, November 15, 2012

4 stars

How exciting can you make a movie where someone's stuck between a rock and a rock for 90 minutes (or 127 hours, as it happened in 2002) and everyone heard about how the case ended? If you're Danny Boyle, you have a lot of ideas. Starting out like a Gatorade or hiking commercial, the film soon after gets very reduced and has to rely entirely on James Franco in his strongest performance to date. While Boyle still adds a few fun camera and stoy-telling gimmicks to spice up the endless time Aron is stuck, the film works thanks to Franco's outstanding acting. The last 10 minutes, with Sigur Ros' "Festival" playing, are absolutely brilliant and leave you deeply touched. A great example of what human beings are capable of and why stories about the will to live always beat "stones fall, everyone dies" endings. Impressing both from the background story and the acting point of view.

- ironclad1609, Thursday, November 15, 2012

4 stars

How exciting can you make a movie where someone's stuck between a rock and a rock for 90 minutes (or 127 hours, as it happened in 2002) and everyone heard about how the case ended? If you're Danny Boyle, you have a lot of ideas. Starting out like a Gatorade or hiking commercial, the film soon after gets very reduced and has to rely entirely on James Franco in his strongest performance to date. While Boyle still adds a few fun camera and stoy-telling gimmicks to spice up the endless time Aron is stuck, the film works thanks to Franco's outstanding acting. The last 10 minutes, with Sigur Ros' "Festival" playing, are absolutely brilliant and leave you deeply touched. A great example of what human beings are capable of and why stories about the will to live always beat "stones fall, everyone dies" endings. Impressing both from the background story and the acting point of view.

- ironclad1609, Thursday, November 15, 2012