Box art for Act of Valor

Act of Valor


When a mission to rescue a kidnapped CIA operative unexpectedly uncovers a chilling plot with potentially unimaginable consequences, a team of the most elite, highly-trained warriors in the modern world is dispatched on a top-secret operation.

Rotten Tomatoes® scores

  • Critic Score
    25%
  • Audience Score
    72%

common sense

PAUSE for kids age 17
Consumerism
0 out of 5
Drinking, drugs, & smoking
1 out of 5
Language
4 out of 5
Positive messages
2 out of 5
Positive role models
2 out of 5
Sex
1 out of 5
Violence
5 out of 5

Real-life SEALs can't save poorly made, violent movie.

what parents need to know

Parents need to know that Act of Valor is a fact-based action movie about the Navy SEALs -- who are mostly played by real-life active-duty SEALs. Strong violence includes a brutal sequence of a woman being kidnapped, beat up, and tortured, and a scene in which many children are killed by truck bomb. There's also tons of guns and shooting, blood, graphic shootings, injuries, and death. Language isn't constant but includes occasional uses of "f--k" and "s--t," as well as some brief innuendo. The movie's message is mixed: On the one hand, the characters are unquestionably brave and selfless team members who value family, country, and sacrifice; but on the other, their job is violent and requires injuring and killing others. The values that viewers bring to the movie will affect how they ultimately perceive its messages.

what families can talk about

  • Families can talk about the Act of Valor's violence. Is it justified? How does it compare to what you've seen in other action movies?
  • Was it the right decision to cast real-life Navy SEALs in the movie? Does it make the movie more realistic? How else does it work? In what ways doesn't it work?
  • How does the movie reflect the military? How does that compare to other military depictions you've seen in movies and on TV?

movie reviews from Rotten Tomatoes®

  • Tomatometer®

    25%
    reviews counted: 0
    see all Act of Valor reviews
  • Audience

    72%

Audience Reviews

3 stars

Act of Valor in my opinion is much underrated. People seem to have missed the mark entirely with this film. Critics have said that the characters lack any development and so on, and that the action war scenes were too intense. Well, guess what. This is what The Navy Seals do. Act of Valor does lack effective character development, but I expected that. What can you expect from this? A real life portrait of real Seals doing what they do best, being the fearless soldiers. Believe me, that's much more interesting than some made up story featuring inaccurate portrayals of Seals. I think this film gives a great portrait of what these men do. I very enjoyed the film and I thought the action scenes were exciting, thrilling and top-notch, and it more than makes up for the so-so performances. The films "actors" aren't actors, they are real life Seals. If you're looking for great performances, this isn't your film. If you enjoy a mindless thrill ride, then give this one a shot. Though the film lacked in an effective story, I enjoyed it very much and I thought it was really intense to watch the Seals on-screen, and that's what made this film good. The cinematography for this film was unique as well; the filmmakers used a first person point of view in many scenes, as if you're playing a game of Call of Duty or Battlefield. I thought it plunged you a bit more into the film, and made the experience that much more thrilling. Is Act of Valor a perfect film? No it's not. Does it offer a thrilling look at how Seals do their jobs, yes it does. As a whole, the story was good, nothing really special, but like I've stated many times here, what makes this film worth seeing is the top-notch action as you real life Seals give us a taste of what they do. A unique War film, not the best, but not the worst either. Expect mindless entertainment, and you'll enjoy it. Turn off your brain, and enjoy. What the Seals do in real life is thrilling and exciting and Act of Valor brings light on the matter pretty well. A must see for war film fans.

- TheDudeLebowski65, Wednesday, June 6, 2012

2 stars

Hollywood often gets ridiculed for its tenuous connection to reality. I doubt any real U.S. Navy Seals look at 1990's Navy Seals as a paragon of military validity. The makers of Act of Valor thought they could do one better than Hollywood. They hired real-life active-duty U.S. Navy Seals as their stars and made a movie based upon Seal combat experiences. Act of Valor was billed as the real deal. I just wish the filmmakers had spent less time on trivial yet realistic details and more time on plot, characters, and enticing action. Who cares that the movie stars actual Navy Seals? Apparently enough people did judging by its healthy box-office returns in the spring, but really, why should a movie be any better because it has real Navy Seals pretending to be actors rather than actors pretending to be Navy Seals? Is this movie brought to a greater level of excellence because the characters know intuitively how to hold a gun properly? Was the slight difference in posture the difference maker? I suppose there is some curiosity seeing real Navy Seals go through all their training, but you know who else could be trained? Actors! Which these fellas are not. The line delivery is so flat, like the Seals were just happy to spit out all their dialogue and move along. There's little emotion to just about any line that isn't communicated via a bark. I can't fault these servicemen because they never signed up to be actors; they have bigger things on their minds. Is there anything in this movie that could not have been done with actors? I doubt it. I understand the gimmick but I just can't comprehend the appeal. Can an actor not be taught how to hold a gun, how to clear a room, how to squeeze the shoulder of his colleague to communicate move forward? I salute the Seals for trying (as well as defending our country, naturally) but I'm reminded of the old adage: it's easier to teach an actor how to sing than a singer how to act. The movie seems more preoccupied with trivial details of authenticity than more important endeavors like story or character development. Here's the most trivial detail of them all: live ammunition was used during the action sequences. WHY?! Do the guns not work with blanks? Why in the world would you dramatically escalate the danger on set and risk every shoot with live ammunition, actual gunplay? Action sequences are already a risk, so why would you exponentially increase the danger for ... a slight uptick in realism? Again, it all feels like a movie in service of a gimmick. The plot is a rather clich-filled jaunt across the world taking down terrorists, rescuing hostages, and mostly just knocking down doors, sweeping rooms, and shooting people in the head. Sure there's a bad guy, a Chechen Islamic terrorist (double bonus: Russian and Arab!) and some other bad foreign guys with beards, but none of it ever seems to matter. I also question why a Chechen extremist would plot to attack the U.S., especially since we don't exactly have the warmest international relationship with Russia. Surely a Chechen attack would strengthen that relationship, and the two countries might work in tandem targeting Chechnya. I'm saying this villainous plan is dumb. The good guys aren't any deeper. Beyond their bravery, skill in combat, and impending fatherhood, we don't know anything about these guys. A series of voiceovers try and list the various characters, but once the action starts good luck remembering any of them. In fact, good luck even keeping the two leads apart. I kept mixing them up myself. And if that wasn't bad enough, the action is a fairly big let down as well. Directors Mike McCoy and Scott Waugh must have studied under Tony Scott or Michael Bay, because every shot has the sleek beauty to it, the dawning sunsets, the cool gun mettle colors, the rah-rah jingoist spirit. Seriously, most of the action is just people shooting one another. That may sound like a no-brainer to anyone who bought a ticket, but the action needs to be properly thought out as well as the plot. The first mission, rescuing the tortured CIA Agent, is the best sequence because it has different points of action, organic consequences, and makes good use of geography. I'm going to hammer this point time and again until people take notice: geography is essential to well-developed action. You need to make use of your surroundings in interesting ways, otherwise what was the point of even setting the action there? The later action sequences fail to make use of any of these integral ingredients, so it becomes a rote series of people entering rooms, shooting other people, and moving to more rooms. Rather, rinse, repeat. The action has a muscular feel but it gets redundant rather quickly. That's when your mind starts to notice how transparently the movie is working as a recruitment film for the U.S. Navy. There are sequences in this film that have no bearing on the plot (submarine visit?) other than to showcase the cool things that you, too, can do when enlisted in the Navy. There are plenty of sustained POV shots that give the illusion of a video game, war as a game. This also why the complexities of war and geo-politics are sanded down to a series of clear-cut missions. I feel like the real servicemen deserve a more complex movie that treats their heroics as something more than clearing a video game level. When you get down to it, the audience that made Act of Valor a hit this past spring reminds me a lot of the audience that went to see the nearly four-hour Civil War movie, Gods and Generals. These are audiences obsessed with the details of realism. They'll pore over the details of costumes and tactics. Whether the movie is actually any good or not, the characters engaging, the plot entertaining, is all immaterial. It's the details they came to see. Hence the real-life Navy Seals, the missions inspired by real Seals, and the live ammunition on set. That's what makes a movie to them. For me, I need more than realistic details; I need people and a story, and if it's an action movie, then there better be well-developed action. It's not like Act of Valor is a documentary people. It's all pretend. I'll be interested in how audiences respond to director Kathryn Bigelow's movie about the hunt and execution of Osama bin Laden. That movie uses actors and has an Oscar-winning director and screenwriter. Let's see if anyone can tell the difference. Nate's Grade: C-

- mrbungle7821, Tuesday, August 7, 2012