Box art for Bereavement

Bereavement

horror


In 1989, six-year-old Martin Bristol (Spencer List of THE ORPHAN KILLER) was kidnapped from his backyard. Graham Sutter (Brett Rickaby of THE CRAZIES), a psychotic recluse, kept Martin imprisoned in his derelict slaughterhouse.

Rotten Tomatoes® scores

  • Critic Score
    44%
  • Audience Score
    29%

movie reviews from Rotten Tomatoes®

  • Tomatometer®

    44%
    reviews counted: 5
    see all Bereavement reviews
  • Audience

    29%

Top Critic Reviews

Fresh: This is an example of what happens when a clever, proficient filmmaker falls in love with brutal trash.

- Colin Covert, Minneapolis Star Tribune, Thursday, March 3, 2011

Rotten: Effective atmospherics don't rescue this formulaic slasher flick.

- Frank Scheck, Hollywood Reporter, Saturday, March 19, 2011

Fresh: Virtually every shot in Bereavement -- a sort of prequel to Mena's Malevolence (2005) -- is the right one; the editing, also by Mena, is first-rate.

- John Anderson, Newsday, Wednesday, March 9, 2011

Audience Reviews

3 stars

"Brought home a boy from the valley. He's young enough to learn the business my way." This recent entry in the "small town psychopathic serial killer" genre isn't exactly a game-changer and it doesn't try to be that scary, but it is a tense, nasty affair that will probably appeal to some horror fans. We've got out deranged killer that preys on young women, a young boy he kidnaps to "assist" him, and a new arrival from out of town (Alexandra Dadarrio) that enjoys taking long runs alone that just happen to pass by a sinister looking and isolated rundown meat-packing plant. If you're guessing that's a recipe for blood, brutality and death, then you're right. Bereavement is fine for what it is, but I doubt I'll be compelled to watch it more than once. There's nothing really exceptional about it, though some of the outdoor cinematography is beautiful, there's a concentrated effort to give depth and a back-story to most of the main characters, and Alexandra is undoubtedly nice eye candy (if there was an Academy Award for filling out a halter top, she'd have it in the bag). The bottom line, though, is that this is such a thoroughly bleak movie that it's almost too realistically grim and hopeless to find entertainment in. That's not necessarily a "flaw", but it's definitely something some viewers will respond less favorably to than others. Oh, and I don't think I've heard this much screaming in a film in quite a while. Have your ears prepared to be assaulted.

- lewiskendell, Wednesday, October 26, 2011

2 stars

I was really looking forward to this prequel to 2004's Malevolent, but was sadly disappointed. The premise of the movie is great and right up my alley. A twisted gore fest about a serial killer who abducts a child, in the hope of making him his predecessor. Sounds good, but in actuality, it was very slow and extremely predictable. I kept hearing about how scary and messed up this film was, did they watch what I just watched? There are a few bright spots here, mainly the cast, which was terrific, and the end of the film, which while predictable, was still really cool to see. Spencer List stars as Martin, the serial killer in waiting. At the ripe old age of 13, this kid has become a B-Horror star! He's this cute, quiet, innocent looking kid, and before you know it he's killed you. He has this way about him, in these types of movies that make it seem real, and he is truly scary. The cast was great, the last twenty minutes was cool to watch, but really there's not much else here.

- Tss807, Saturday, September 3, 2011

4 stars

First section of a three-part trilogy which surpasses the sequel. This movie doesn't rely on cheap scares or excessive gore to grip the audience, it relies on fear and subjective scares. Pretty good prequel/slasher film!

- John2223, Sunday, September 4, 2011