Box art for Biutiful

Biutiful

drama, foreign


Javier Bardem stars in this unflinching, heartfelt story from the director of AMORES PERROS and BABEL.

Rotten Tomatoes® scores

  • Critic Score
    64%
  • Audience Score
    74%

movie reviews from Rotten Tomatoes®

  • Tomatometer®

    64%
    reviews counted: 3
    see all Biutiful reviews
  • Audience

    74%

Top Critic Reviews

Fresh: Proves Irritu as a talent in its own right ... it's good to be able to say that, with Biutiful, Irritu is four for four.

- Joe Utichi, Cinematical, Thursday, June 24, 2010

Fresh:

- Justin Chang, Variety, Tuesday, July 6, 2010

Fresh: This Cannes Festival competition entry may be too dark and depressing for mainstream audiences, but it is clearly the heartfelt and very personal achievement of a master filmmaker with a potentially award winning performance from its star.

- Sara Maria Vizcarrondo, Boxoffice Magazine, Wednesday, July 7, 2010

Audience Reviews

4 stars

After discovering that he is dying of cancer, a father and smuggler tries to "put his affairs in order." Javier Bardem can do anything. He chilled in No Country for Old Men, he made us laugh in Vicki Christina Barcelona, and his dramatic work in The Dancer Upstairs and The Sea Inside enthralls. And now he brings us Uxbal, a soulful, damaged father who is hard to classify. His profession as a smuggler of illegal immigrants who are essentially slave labor makes him "bad," but when he buys them heaters and frets over the best care for his children, he immediately earns our sympathy. Bardem plays all the nuances. He can scare as readily as he can inspire tears. His work in this film is beyond compare, and if I had seen this film in 2011, I might have changed my Oscar vote (not that I have a vote). Writer/director Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu mines familiar territory, and anyone who has seen 21 Grams won't be surprised to see themes of faith, spirituality, and fate explored in this film. But the universality of these themes and Inarritu's deftness as a filmmaker make Biutiful seem fresh, more original than his other films. Uxbal seems to have the ability to speak to the dead, and people occasionally perch from the ceiling, which I think is Inarritu's way of showing their souls watching the characters. With all the good filmmaking in Biutiful, the wonderfully human story of a father making sure his kids are well-cared-for after his death, I don't think the film needs this element - the speaker for the dead subplots - in order to be successful. Overall, Biutiful is indeed beautiful, made more so by one of the master actors of our time.

- hunterjt13, Saturday, October 13, 2012

4 stars

After discovering that he is dying of cancer, a father and smuggler tries to "put his affairs in order." Javier Bardem can do anything. He chilled in No Country for Old Men, he made us laugh in Vicki Christina Barcelona, and his dramatic work in The Dancer Upstairs and The Sea Inside enthralls. And now he brings us Uxbal, a soulful, damaged father who is hard to classify. His profession as a smuggler of illegal immigrants who are essentially slave labor makes him "bad," but when he buys them heaters and frets over the best care for his children, he immediately earns our sympathy. Bardem plays all the nuances. He can scare as readily as he can inspire tears. His work in this film is beyond compare, and if I had seen this film in 2011, I might have changed my Oscar vote (not that I have a vote). Writer/director Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu mines familiar territory, and anyone who has seen 21 Grams won't be surprised to see themes of faith, spirituality, and fate explored in this film. But the universality of these themes and Inarritu's deftness as a filmmaker make Biutiful seem fresh, more original than his other films. Uxbal seems to have the ability to speak to the dead, and people occasionally perch from the ceiling, which I think is Inarritu's way of showing their souls watching the characters. With all the good filmmaking in Biutiful, the wonderfully human story of a father making sure his kids are well-cared-for after his death, I don't think the film needs this element - the speaker for the dead subplots - in order to be successful. Overall, Biutiful is indeed beautiful, made more so by one of the master actors of our time.

- hunterjt13, Saturday, October 13, 2012

3 stars

Too sad and depressing, this solid drama attempts to create an unbearable sensation of tragedy that does not always feel genuine. Even so, it benefits from a strong performance by Bardem, who is able to inject some complexity to his character despite the rather artificial plot.

- blacksheepboy, Friday, February 24, 2012