Box art for BloodRayne:The Third Reich

BloodRayne:The Third Reich

  • Rated R

independent, special interest


Rayne fights against the Nazis in Europe during World War II, encountering Ekart Brand, a Nazi leader whose target is to inject Adolf Hitler with Rayne's blood in an attempt to transform him into a vampire and attain immortality.

Rotten Tomatoes® scores

  • Critic Score
    N/A
  • Audience Score
    13%

movie reviews from Rotten Tomatoes®

Audience Reviews

0 star

What to say about the Bloodrayne franchise now? Now that the series is in its third entry, and never has shown any signs of watchable value, it's clear that this was made for a quick buck. Master of Schlock horror, Uwe Boll, who redeemed himself with the action horror thriller Rampage basically goes back to his roots and makes another bad. I simply hope that this is the last Bloodrayne film, as this truly one of the most awful series in the history of horror. This is yet another awful schlock fest that really doesn't have anything memorable. Boll's third Bloodrayne film is a poorly constructed mess like the last two in the series. This film lacks a great story, and it proves that Boll can't direct a consistent film that is worth watching. The Third Reich may have been an interesting idea for a vampire film, but the problem is, is that it's helmed by Uwe Boll who is one of the worst directors working today. Maybe if this film would have been directed by someone else, and had a better script than maybe it would have been a good try. Unfortunately with every Boll film, it's a horrible misfire. With very poor directing, a poor script and poor cast, Bloodrayne: The Third Reich simply isn't worth watching. Uwe Boll makes another dud. Hopefully this is the final entry in the Bloodrayne franchise, as this is probably the most brain dead franchise in horror since the Leprechaun and Puppet Master series.

- TheDudeLebowski65, Thursday, June 14, 2012

2 stars

It took five years and three movies, but notorious film director Uwe Boll has finally gotten to the original time period of the Bloodrayne video game. The popular game concerns a lithe, redheaded half-vampiric lass killing nefarious Nazis in World War II. You would have thought that would make for a decent starting point. But Boll instead took his time, possibly always envisioning a trilogy to due the character and his storytelling ambition proper service. Or it was just a way to make more money. So after stops in 18-century Romania and the Wild West, Rayne comes home, so to speak in Bloodrayne: The Third Reich. What if somebody was adapting the Grand Theft Auto franchise into a film and took Boll's dawdling approach? The first film would probably start with horses and buggies. Rayne (Natassia Malthe), our favorite dhampir, is back at slaying them dead. She teams up with Nathaniel (Brendan Fletcher) and his band of resistance fighters on the Eastern front. They rescue one train filled with prisoners and get into a shootout with Commandant Ekhart Brand (Michael Par). But Rayne makes the unfortunate mistake of biting the Commandant before impaling the guy. She has unknowingly turned the Nazi officer into a vampire like her, one that can walk in daylight. You would think after 200 years of existence she would have a handle on this. The Commandant is educated in the ways of the vampire by a mad scientist, Dr. Mangler (Clint Howard), who enjoys torturing human and vampire alike for science. At one point the doc says, while slicing up a living body," Vampires no longer have any bonds to the moral laws of man." That seems like a pot/kettle situation to me. The Commandant assembles his own undead army of vampire soldiers. Rayne feels responsible for this ugly mess and vows to kill the Commandant again and to a satisfying degree of dead this time. For a while, Bloodrayne III looks like it might be the best in the trilogy, admittedly a dubious honor. Despite all my misgivings, Bloodrayne III almost works on its own lowered-expectation exploitation genre level. Almost. The campy combination of Nazis and vampires is a wild premise, though hardly original, and should reap some ripe and schlocky exploitation entertainment. The locations in Croatia are terrific and add just enough authenticity for a story about a vampire lady killing Nazis. In fact one sequence plays like Boll's take on Tarantino's Inglourious Basterds, involving a tavern showdown where people play a tense game of secret identities. There are moments that work, little bursts of promise, but they get reaped all too quickly. Boll's action choreography is sadly limited in scope and editing. He sticks too close to his characters, never allowing for complicated tussles or expanding the scope of the action. There are a few serviceable explosions, some minor gore effects, but Boll does nobody any favor when the action is too brief and brittle. Everything feels pared down so most of the fights involve minimal players and the sequences themselves mostly give way to redundant posturing. The failings of Bloodrayne III are roughly the same failings that dogged Bloodrayne II: Boll does not embrace his film's inherent cheesiness. I wrote about 2007's Bloodrayne: Deliverance: "Boll seems uneasy about embracing its supernaturally campy potential. Bloodrayne II has little blood, zero gore, no nudity, no sex, and a pitifully scant amount of action. In other words, it's missing all of the exploitation elements that make a movie like Bloodrayne II worth watching." While Boll has seen fit to correct the absence of certain genre elements, notably blood and boobs, he still cannot seize the pulpy premise into Grand Guignol. Nazi vampires, an immortal Hitler, a 200-year-old ass-kicking woman with signature arm-blades AND Clint Howard as a mad Nazi scientist and this is the best you can do? That's unacceptable. The supernatural potential is wasted here. Rayne's vampire side is barely utilized. She bites people, she jumps high once, but there's nothing really vampiric about her beside one scene where she complains about having to drink pig's blood. She might as well be anything else if you're not going to take advantage of what makes a vampire a vampire. At one point, the Commandant turns his best tracker into a vampire for the purposes of finding Rayne (her secret hideout turns out to be a not very discreet large castle). That idea had great promise, all things considered, but like most of the other fights, it's one-and-done. Rayne takes out the guy and we move along. Rayne is betrayed by one of the brothel girls who has her eyes set on running the business ("You're a cocksucking entrepreneur," someone declares, though I wouldn't put that exact terminology on a resume). She gets turned into a vampire too. All right, she could work as a character that could get close to Rayne. But then she too is dispatched with mercurial swiftness. Why the hurry? Bloodrayne III runs a total 72 minutes before end credits. The film could have used a lot more fleshing out, and it could have benefited from being less serious with something so flatly ridiculous. It wouldn't be a Boll movie without the whiplash-inducing shifts in tone. One second we're dwelling on the campy idea of Herr Hitler becoming a powerful vampire (there's even a goofy dream sequence where Rayne is terrorized by Adolph with fangs) and the next minute the film descends into soft-core porn territory. Rayne visits a brothel to get an oiled massage, because apparently being a centuries-old undead slayer of evil can really cause some killer knots that only hookers are properly trained to knead away. Anyway, Rayne saves one of the brothel girls from an abusive Nazi john, and the women of Eastern Front brothel wish to show their gratitude, via some sex "on the house." We're then treated to a solid four minutes of heavy breathing and gauzy soft-focus shots of hands, nipples, and crevices. To Boll's credit, it's on par with most soft-core porn productions. When Rayne is beating the Nazi john she becomes a feminist mouthpiece: "I can't punish you for the legions of women who have been brutalized by men, but I'll give it my best shot." If Sucker Punch proved anything, it's hard to stand on a feminist soapbox when your characters are pure male fantasy figures. The onscreen lesbian tryst would fit the context of the film better if Boll kept a continuity of tawdry sensuality. I don't recall any other lesbian leanings in previous entries but I suppose spontaneous lesbians/opportune bisexuality just goes with direct-to-DVD territory. The only other element of sexuality occurs late in Bloodrayne III, like ten minutes to credits, Rayne and Nathaniel decide it's time to get it on. Oh, did I mention that they come to this decision while in the back of a German transport truck on the way to Berlin. Nonetheless, an awkward and deeply unerotic sex scene follows before their rescue. They appear to be making the most of their time, though curiously both participants leave their fingerless gloves on while they copulate. I call it "hobo lovemaking." Boll doesn't seem to understand what a truly juicy concept vampire Nazis are, so we are treated to a lot of talking. But it's not talking that really establishes character, setting, or plot; it's mostly a jumble of self-aggrandizing, hyperbolic asides as heroes and villains are constantly reconfirming the stakes. Vampire Nazis. Trust us, we get it. But alas, the Commandant keeps gripping his fists and speaking about being "power incarnate" and how everyone shall bow to his power and how he's "the prodigal son of the Third Reich," which I don't think is the proper analogy to apply. Dr. Mangler (too on-the-nose or an attempt to reference Dr. Mengele? You are the judge) will not let any situation to bray about the obvious go to waste, sometimes with peculiar anachronisms. Over the course of the film, this talkative evil scientist will reference Shakespeare, say "the world is your oyster," and even, "The times they are a changin', gyspy." He even slams the father of penicillin, saying, "Alexander Fleming had his fungi. I have Rayne]." But the worst offenders have to be Rayne and Nathaniel. At one point they bellow, "He's not just a vampire! He's a vampire with an entire German army behind him!" You know, in case you couldn't grasp the subtleties of the narrative. Rayne is given to long passages of voice over where we get to listen to her wax poetic about man's inhumanity to man, the cycle of violence, and other hilarious grasps at being mistaken as having, you know, depth, or thoughts. This is the same character who ends the film saying, "Guten tach, mother fuckers!" Yeah, this one's a regular Rodin. The film is populated entirely with Boll's stock players, so you know the acting returns will be fairly diminished. Malthe (Elektra) returns for her second go-round as the titular half-vampire half-human heroine. For what reason, I could not say. Perhaps the former Maxim model had a large gas bill one winter. Malthe hasn't advanced much as an actress in the layover between sequels. She fills out a bodice heavenly, but her acting is about as emotionless and dryly ineffectual as a corpse. Speaking of, Malthe looks deathly pale in the film, with alarmingly alabaster-hued skin. Apparently in the 60 years since the events of Bloodrayne 2, she decided to keep the cleavage-accentuated fighting outfits but lose her skin tone and her heretofore signature red hair. But fear not video game aficionados because this Rayne has streaks of bright red amongst her otherwise jet black tresses. I suppose she found the one Hot Topic open on the Eastern front. Malthe is fine-looking woman who will look the part, no matter what improbable form-fitting outfit she chooses to slay evil, until she opens her mouth and destroys the illusion. There's a reason not too many Maxim models have transitioned over into being award-winning actresses. To be fair, the Rayne character is mostly defined by costuming and weaponry. Don't believe me? Read the user reviews by fanboys and see what they quibble over most. It wouldn't be a Boll film without his lucky charm, Par (11 Boll film appearances!). The plainspoken actor was actually a fine fit in Bloodrayne II as a cowpoke. He's not so well a good fit as an evil Nazi officer. Par is never truly threatening in any capacity as a Nazi or a vampire. That's pretty sad. He's given tough guy things to say, and he bites people, but he never comes across as menacing. He's letting the uniform do the acting for him. Likewise, Howard (first Boll appearance since 2003's House of the Dead) gets lost in the broad generalization of his character. Howard always seems like he's on the verge of breaking into third person. He seems lost in a daze too often. Howard comes across as more Igor than mad scientist. He's definitely not going to be one the scientists other countries offer asylum for at war's end. Bloodrayne: The Third Reich could have been a ridiculously, yet, enjoyably campy, B-movie that knew how to play to its strengths - vampire Nazis, attractive woman killing vampire Nazis. You would think that salaciously junky concept would write itself. The problem is that Boll seems to have made a movie that seemed like it would write itself. It's not enough to just have a handful of genre elements (vampires, Hitler, lesbians!), you have to present those elements in an appealing manner. The premise is workable but the plot, characters, action, and tone are not given necessary attention. I never thought I would say this, but there's just not enough holding together a movie about vampire Nazis. The dialogue is mostly characters talking in circles, rehashing what should be obvious, explaining why the bad guys should be threats when they fail to be credible onscreen in deed. The film might be the best of the ongoing trilogy, but what exactly is that saying? Barely covering 75 minutes, with negligible action and an overall rushed pace, Bloodrayne III is a sterling example of disposable entertainment that hasn't even been given the necessary components to be "entertainment." Instead it's just eminently disposable. The saddest part is knowing it's only so long before this character gets resurrected for a fourth movie. Perhaps by then Boll will have figured out what to do with his vampire-thwarting hottie. Fourth time's the charm, right? Nate's Grade: C-

- mrbungle7821, Monday, August 1, 2011

2 stars

Boll keeps on churning out his films despite none of them ever doing well and here is the third in the quite poor 'Bloodrayne' franchise adapted from the much better and much sexier computer game. This time its the Nazi's to get a thumping from the sexy vamp and quite unbelievably this film isn't that bad and is considerably better than the hideous second film set in the Wild West. Its basic all the way through and doesn't really show much in the form of class of course but its a stable film with reasonable bloody fights including some serious slashing going on, the location works for the film and does add a chilly bleak atmosphere, costumes are decent enough (Pare in his black leather Nazi commander uniform with matching black leather hood is actually pretty cool) and the direction isn't all that bad overall, definitely moved up a league from the 'Boll Division' to B-movie status methinks. If he could just move away from constantly using Michael Pare....

- phubbs1, Sunday, May 22, 2011