Box art for Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

drama


a wealthy plantation owner succumbing to cancer one of the most acclaimed movies in history. Year: 1958

Rotten Tomatoes® scores

  • Critic Score
    97%
  • Audience Score
    93%

common sense

ON for kids age 13
Consumerism
0 out of 5
Drinking, drugs, & smoking
3 out of 5
Language
1 out of 5
Positive messages
0 out of 5
Sex
3 out of 5
Violence
1 out of 5

Classics-loving teens will appreciate family melodrama.

what parents need to know

Parents need to know that the characters in this movie lie to each other and keep secrets from each other. One of the characters is an alcoholic.

what families can talk about

  • Families can talk about the lies that the characters tell each other. Why does Maggie compare herself to a cat on a hot tin roof? What is the roof, and what makes it hot? Why won't Brick agree to get Maggie pregnant? Who is he mad at? Why? Why does Brick have such contempt for himself? What does Skipper's death have to do with it? What makes Brick change his mind?

movie reviews from Rotten Tomatoes®

Audience Reviews

4 stars

A brilliantly written screenplay (based on the play by Tennessee Williams) is brought to life by its stars. The family of a dying southern millionaire (Burl Ives) plot and scheme to see who can get his money. The older brother, "Gooper" (Jack Carson) seems to have the inside track, he does everything right, he lives where "big daddy" wants him to live, he gets the job Big Daddy tells him to get, and he has kids like Big Daddy wants him to. And yet, it's the younger brother "Brick" (Paul Newman), the washed up football star-turned alcoholic who's the favorite. As the movie begins, we find Brick absolutely loathing his wife (Elizabeth Taylor). At first it's suggested it's because she's just as greedy as the rest of his family, but soon we learn there's more to it. Everyone in the family is crippled inside. In reality, it's not Big Daddy's money they want, it's his love (well maybe Sisterwoman wants the money). We too, get sucked inside this world of petty bickering and sycophantism, and forget the man who's dying, that is, until Brick finally breaks down and confronts him. What results is a scene of terrible poignancy as the dying man recalls memories of his own father dying, as he sits in his basement surrounded by tons of expensive things that were bought and stored away, never to be opened again. A movie that peels back the layers of cynicism and gets to the heart of people's humanity.

- bottcorecords1, Saturday, January 9, 2010

4 stars

A brilliantly written screenplay (based on the play by Tennessee Williams) is brought to life by its stars. The family of a dying southern millionaire (Burl Ives) plot and scheme to see who can get his money. The older brother, "Gooper" (Jack Carson) seems to have the inside track, he does everything right, he lives where "big daddy" wants him to live, he gets the job Big Daddy tells him to get, and he has kids like Big Daddy wants him to. And yet, it's the younger brother "Brick" (Paul Newman), the washed up football star-turned alcoholic who's the favorite. As the movie begins, we find Brick absolutely loathing his wife (Elizabeth Taylor). At first it's suggested it's because she's just as greedy as the rest of his family, but soon we learn there's more to it. Everyone in the family is crippled inside. In reality, it's not Big Daddy's money they want, it's his love (well maybe Sisterwoman wants the money). We too, get sucked inside this world of petty bickering and sycophantism, and forget the man who's dying, that is, until Brick finally breaks down and confronts him. What results is a scene of terrible poignancy as the dying man recalls memories of his own father dying, as he sits in his basement surrounded by tons of expensive things that were bought and stored away, never to be opened again. A movie that peels back the layers of cynicism and gets to the heart of people's humanity.

- bottcorecords1, Saturday, January 9, 2010

3 stars

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof is a good movie with great acting all around, but it really makes me mad that the play was changed so much because of the production codes of the fifties.

- adfill7, Friday, February 20, 2009