Box art for Hyde Park on Hudson

Hyde Park on Hudson

documentary, drama


Bill Murray and Laura Linney star in this engaging look at the pivotal meeting between US President Franklin D. Roosevelt and the King and Queen of England at FDRs home in upstate New York.

Rotten Tomatoes® scores

  • Critic Score
    36%
  • Audience Score
    31%

common sense

ON for kids age 16
Consumerism
0 out of 5
Drinking, drugs, & smoking
3 out of 5
Language
2 out of 5
Positive messages
2 out of 5
Positive role models
1 out of 5
Sex
3 out of 5
Violence
0 out of 5

Presidential drama is well acted but short on passion.

what parents need to know

Parents need to know that Hyde Park on Hudson is a light period drama focusing on a fateful weekend when President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (Bill Murray) played host to the king and queen of England. Against a rich backdrop of pre-World War II history, an infatuation develops between the president and his distant cousin, Margaret Stuckley (Laura Linney). The movie offers a decidedly intimate portrayal of the president, following him into his bedroom. One fairly sexual scene takes place in a car; nothing graphic is shown, but movements and gestures imply that a woman is using her hand to pleasure a man. A naked woman is also seen in the background of another scene (fuzzily), and there's also some swearing and plenty of period-accurate smoking and drinking.

what families can talk about

  • Families can talk about how Hyde Park on Hudson portrays Roosevelt. How does it compare to the FDR we usually see in movies and TV shows? Which do you think is a more accurate depiction? Why do filmmakers sometimes take liberties with history?
  • Is it challenging to view a beloved president in this light? Or does Hyde Park on Hudson do a good job of humanizing him, even if it means knocking him off the proverbial pedestal?
  • Why is Daisy drawn to FDR, and vice versa? How does the film portray Eleanor Roosevelt and her reaction to Daisy?

movie reviews from Rotten Tomatoes®

Top Critic Reviews

Fresh: Basically a frothy tabloid take on presidential history. And for my money, that's a good thing in a season filled with puffed-up prestige pictures.

- Lou Lumenick, New York Post, Friday, December 7, 2012

Audience Reviews

1 star

There's a certain genre of film that I've never particularly cottoned to - the historical period drama. THE KING'S SPEECH is a perfect example. It's a pretty flawless film, stunningly entertaining and beautifully acted, but in the end, give me raw, gutsy stakes like we get on BREAKING BAD or else I check out. I JUST DIDN'T CARE and the only things I'll remember from the film are how Helena Bonham Carter folded her hands together and the distorted shots of the old-fashioned radio mikes. Sure, there are a couple of Merchant/Ivory films I loved - REMAINS OF THE DAY, HOWARD'S END, and A ROOM WITH A VIEW come to mind, but none of them have stuck with me in the same way NETWORK, THE EXORCIST, or PAPER MOON have. I tend to call the genre HOOP SKIRTS AND CORSETS. Now don't get me wrong, we can learn a lot by looking back, but after a while, it all tends to come across as WHITE PEOPLES' PROBLEMS. (make a mental note: that would make a great name for a band - sort of a THE NEGRO PROBLEM 2.0). There's too much self-satisfaction going on, as if everyone, the cast AND the audience, make little "tutting" sounds to prove how superior they are to everyone else around them. "Look at us! We're cultured! Bring on more iambic pentameter!" So enter HYDE PARK ON HUDSON, which on the surface, looks like a perfectly respectable entry. You have a cast with an undeniable pedigree, a director who certainly has proven to have visual flair despite a spotty record, and an unusual subject matter, FDR hosting the King and Queen of England while simultaneously boinking his cousin. It's certainly handsomely shot, and Bill Murray is a daring choice to play the 1939 President, and the tone is quite genial, but after about an hour, I had had enough. I walked out. I just didn't care what I was watching. It wouldn't be fair to fully review this film. I was bored beyond belief. I heard the King and Queen stuff is pretty fun, and I'm sure everyone acquits themselves respectfully. Others told me that it's pretty shapeless and doesn't really go anywhere. Clearly, this one ain't for everyone. It just makes me want to say, please path the meth and throw out the granny panties!

- fb720603734, Sunday, November 4, 2012

1 star

There's a certain genre of film that I've never particularly cottoned to - the historical period drama. THE KING'S SPEECH is a perfect example. It's a pretty flawless film, stunningly entertaining and beautifully acted, but in the end, give me raw, gutsy stakes like we get on BREAKING BAD or else I check out. I JUST DIDN'T CARE and the only things I'll remember from the film are how Helena Bonham Carter folded her hands together and the distorted shots of the old-fashioned radio mikes. Sure, there are a couple of Merchant/Ivory films I loved - REMAINS OF THE DAY, HOWARD'S END, and A ROOM WITH A VIEW come to mind, but none of them have stuck with me in the same way NETWORK, THE EXORCIST, or PAPER MOON have. I tend to call the genre HOOP SKIRTS AND CORSETS. Now don't get me wrong, we can learn a lot by looking back, but after a while, it all tends to come across as WHITE PEOPLES' PROBLEMS. (make a mental note: that would make a great name for a band - sort of a THE NEGRO PROBLEM 2.0). There's too much self-satisfaction going on, as if everyone, the cast AND the audience, make little "tutting" sounds to prove how superior they are to everyone else around them. "Look at us! We're cultured! Bring on more iambic pentameter!" So enter HYDE PARK ON HUDSON, which on the surface, looks like a perfectly respectable entry. You have a cast with an undeniable pedigree, a director who certainly has proven to have visual flair despite a spotty record, and an unusual subject matter, FDR hosting the King and Queen of England while simultaneously boinking his cousin. It's certainly handsomely shot, and Bill Murray is a daring choice to play the 1939 President, and the tone is quite genial, but after about an hour, I had had enough. I walked out. I just didn't care what I was watching. It wouldn't be fair to fully review this film. I was bored beyond belief. I heard the King and Queen stuff is pretty fun, and I'm sure everyone acquits themselves respectfully. Others told me that it's pretty shapeless and doesn't really go anywhere. Clearly, this one ain't for everyone. It just makes me want to say, please path the meth and throw out the granny panties!

- fb720603734, Sunday, November 4, 2012

2 stars

First thing is first, as I have mentioned before I try to watch as many movies nominated for awards as possible. I'm a firm believer in you can't complain about what is nominated without seeing the movies nominated. So looking over the Golden Globe nominates I saw Bill Murray up for Best Actor in a Comedy for "Hyde Park on Hudson". One would naturally think "Bill Murray+Comedy=Gold". However, this is not a comedy in any way shape or form and his least funny movie ever. Here he plays Franklin Roosevelt(yes the president) in 1939 and is about to host the King and Queen of England for a week at the Roosevelt home. Amid all this he juggles his wife, his mother, and a woman whom he has a "special" relationship with Daisy(Laura Linney). They don't really have an affair, but they have an affair, and at the heart of the movie is their relationship. How they just drive off and enjoy being alone together away from the world. Sound funny? Yeh, it didn't to me either. This film is pretty boring, although Murray and Linney are both great, just as they are in everything else they do. But this is not a comedy, it's a drama. The only laughs are at the expense of the King Bertie(the King from "King's Speech" with the studdering problem), but there is really only like one scene of his that will get a chuckle. It moves slow, even though the story is intriguing and offers a good glimpse at President Roosevelt that no other movie(that I know of) has offered. Decent for a one time watch, but don't expect a comedy. Expect a drama that drags, and you won't be too disappointed.

- fb100000145236770, Monday, January 7, 2013