Box art for I Love You Phillip Morris

I Love You Phillip Morris

comedy


Jim Carrey and Ewan McGregor star in the outrageously funny true story of a con man's journey from small-town businessman to flamboyant white-collar criminal, who repeatedly finds himself in trouble with the law.

Rotten Tomatoes® scores

  • Critic Score
    72%
  • Audience Score
    61%

common sense

PAUSE for kids age 16
Consumerism
0 out of 5
Drinking, drugs, & smoking
2 out of 5
Language
4 out of 5
Positive messages
0 out of 5
Positive role models
0 out of 5
Sex
4 out of 5
Violence
2 out of 5

Wacky but mature comedy examines a love with no limits.

what parents need to know

Parents need to know that this based-on-a-true-story black comedy centers on a man (played by Jim Carrey) who leaves his family and becomes an unapologetic con man to support a self-indulgent life of shopping, partying, and sex. He eventually lands in prison, where he falls madly in love with a fellow male inmate. While there's little nudity (some glimpses of male backsides), there are several highly suggestive sex scenes -- both gay and straight -- and lots of explicit language, including "f--k," "s--t," and some homophobic slurs. The main character's devotion to his object of affection is clear, but the often criminal lengths he goes to for love hardly qualify him for role model of the year.

what families can talk about

  • Families can talk about the fact that the movie is based on a true story. Do you think it's all accurate? Why do you think filmmakers might decide to change certain parts of fact-based stories?
  • Do you think Steven Russell's actions, including stealing and deception, demonstrate real love? Parents, talk to your teens about your own family's values regarding sex and relationships.

movie reviews from Rotten Tomatoes®

Top Critic Reviews

Rotten: Unfortunately, the fact that its based on a true story is the only convincing thing about the movie.

- Alexander Pashby, Little White Lies, Thursday, June 24, 2010

Fresh: Carrey demonstrates an ability to successfully flit between the kind of flat-out slapstick physical humour with which he made his name and that darker, more disturbing strain of comedy he never quite nailed in early efforts such as The Cable Guy.

- Alistair Harkness, Scotsman, Thursday, June 24, 2010

Rotten: The romance between them is touching at its best moments, corny at its worst.

- Amy Biancolli, Houston Chronicle, Friday, December 10, 2010

Audience Reviews

4 stars

The recipe for a good Jim Carrey movie is simple: give his character a singular focus (see: Ace Ventura; Liar, Liar; Yes Man). Here, his character, Steve Russell, has a compulsive desire to give his dream partner - the titular Phillip Morris (Ewan McGregor) - absolutely everything, which drives him to commit con after con, trying always to keep the law off his tail, and Phillip Morris in love with him. Morris, of course, is played sweetly by McGregor, as the delicate partner who just wants them to be together, and the two leads have great chemistry overall. Plus, the jokes are just cynical - or failing that, raunchy - enough to keep you laughing. And, what I perhaps liked most about this movie, is that it talks to you as though you, too, are being conned; some viewers might not like the twist at the end, as it doesn't seem too well set up, but keep in mind: Russell is narrating this story. You didn't expect he'd tell you more than you need to know up front, now, did you? As the tagline says, and as a good con artist would tell you of his next lie: it's so incredible it has to be true. It all makes for a delightful, underrated surprise of a movie that, though it gets a little too heavy in the end, tells a fun and touching love story.

- danperry17, Tuesday, July 3, 2012

1 star

A

- fb1378820053, Tuesday, April 16, 2013

3 stars

Steven Russell: I love you, Phillip Morris! I love you! "Based On A True Story... No, Really It Is" The story of Steven Russell and the man he loves, Phillip Morris, is one crazy fucking story. The film portrays it no differently. Sure it goes a little to the extreme with some of the homosexual content, and that surely will make hard core Republicans squirm in their chairs. But the movie is truly funny, and one of Jim Carrey's better films and performances in the last several years. He plays Steven Russell, a character of many aspects. At the beginning of the movie, he is married with a daughter and is a Texas police officer. He knows he is gay, but is just in the closet about it. Then he tells his wife, and starts his new life as a gay man, which as he describes is really expensive. So he starts running scams and becomes a conman. Soon he finds himself in prison where he meets the love of his life, and the story just gets wackier from there. I Love You Phillip Morris has moments where it really isn't anything special, but for most of the runtime it is entertaining. Carey and McGregor are both really good and really convincing as gay men, especially McGregor. The movie isn't really laugh out loud funny all the time, but it has moments that are really funny and many other instances where it is funny, but not in a way that will make you laugh out loud. A lot of the humor I found funny kind of embarrassed me. I still find all this gay humor hilarious and this movie doesn't skimp on it. There's a lot of sexual acts humor and a fair amount of dick related jokes as well. This movie isn't going to win any subtlety contests, but for a story like this; the movie really did need to be over the top like this, because the real man is way over the top. Surely this won't be for everyone, but if you won't be offended by the material, which I don't see why anyone should in today's world; give it a watch. If you're a Jim Carey fan, this is a welcome sight. It's something we need from him when he brings out movies like Mr. Poppers Penguins. It isn't going to touch some of his works that made him a star, but it is heads and heels above what he has been doing for the last 10 years. Well, except for Eternal Sunshine for the Spotless Mind.

- blkbomb, Sunday, May 20, 2012