Box art for Limitless

Limitless

action & adventure, sci-fi & fantasy, thrillers


Science tells us that humans use only ten percent of their brain.When EddieMora stumbles upon a pill that gives him access to the full 100 percent, he thinks he's uncovered the key to living out his wildest dreams.

Rotten Tomatoes® scores

  • Critic Score
    70%
  • Audience Score
    73%

common sense

PAUSE for kids age 15
Consumerism
0 out of 5
Drinking, drugs, & smoking
5 out of 5
Language
3 out of 5
Positive messages
0 out of 5
Positive role models
0 out of 5
Sex
3 out of 5
Violence
4 out of 5

Story centered on drug abuse sends very iffy messages.

what parents need to know

Parents need to know that this sci-fi thriller based on a novel by Alan Glynn stars The Hangover's Bradley Cooper as a man who becomes addicted to a (fictional) drug that enhances users' mental powers, using it to further his own power and wealth. He becomes involved with gangsters and loan sharks, which leads to plenty of violence, including shooting, stabbing, and blood. He also sleeps with many women, and there's language (including one "f--k" and a few "s--t"s) and frequent drinking. Although the movie is rated PG-13, the message -- that drugs can help you overcome problems related to confidence and motivation -- and the lack of consequences for most of the main character's drug-fueled decisions and actions make Limitless a very iffy choice for teens.

what families can talk about

  • Families can talk about how the movie portrays drug use. What are the consequences? Does that seem realistic? If a drug like NZT was real, what do you think would happen to people who took it?
  • How can people find confidence and motivation without the use of illegal substances?
  • Is the movie's violence scary or threatening? How is the violence affected by the idea that the main character is in control of everything that happens?

movie reviews from Rotten Tomatoes®

  • Tomatometer®

    70%
    reviews counted: 0
    see all Limitless reviews
  • Audience

    73%

Audience Reviews

3 stars

I'm not sure Limitless (or should I say Neil Burger) knew exactly what it wanted to be. As an anti drug film it excels, should the deprivation that a drug habit can lead to - that is until the end. It is also an interesting Sci-fi 'What if' scenario, reminiscent of a Philip K. Dick story - the possibilities of which could have been endless. In the end, although it is a good film, it is let down by the complete lack of moral (point) at the end of the film, which doesn't feel like it was the intended conclusion and I suspect there might have been some meddling by producers with cold feet. Maybe we'll never know but I think it could and should have been better - it's all down to the last 15 minutes.

- SirPant, Monday, December 12, 2011

2 stars

This real life story of a man who gets hold of a drug that enables one to work to their full potential is watchable enough, but nothing that would make me want it go on limitless. While the director does a fair job with the storytelling, and changing names and maintaining the anonymity of the characters involved, that's not quite enough to fulfill my doze of entertainment. The director gotta take one pill, I guess.

- imrealgod, Tuesday, January 10, 2012

2 stars

"Limitless"... the premise has limitless possibilities but takes very uninteresting turns. Little to no character development; when there's a hint of it about to pop up, the movie smothers it with its ridiculous solutions that no longer become about the character but about a substance. The script was lacking. One second, it leaves viewers out in the dark with its "elaborate" dialogue that consists of financial business but the next second, it becomes very elementary and downright cheesy. Bradley Cooper has talent - I'll give him that but the rest of the cast (except for the once again poorly casted, Robert De Niro) was not convincing at all. Hated the beginning, hated the ending, and just when it seems like "Limitless" has hope, it never manages to grow.

- fb1463751009, Saturday, March 10, 2012