Box art for Marvin's Room

Marvin's Room

drama


Leonardo DiCaprio (TITANIC, CATCH ME IF YOU CAN) drives an electrifying performance as the criminally rebellious son in this funny and stirring tale of one family's humor and heartache.

Rotten Tomatoes® scores

  • Critic Score
    80%
  • Audience Score
    62%

movie reviews from Rotten Tomatoes®

  • Tomatometer®

    80%
    reviews counted: 14
    see all Marvin's Room reviews
  • Audience

    62%

Top Critic Reviews

Fresh:

- Brian Tallerico, UGO, Thursday, June 24, 2010

Fresh:

- Cole Smithey, ColeSmithey.com, Thursday, June 24, 2010

Rotten: Marvin's Room seems to exist primarily to road-test every one of your emotions.

- Desson Thomson, Washington Post, Saturday, January 1, 2000

Audience Reviews

3 stars

Sometimes the people you know the least...are the ones you need the most! Good movie! 'Marvin's Room' doesn't try to give simple answers; after all, all families have dysfunctions, but instead is like a canvas that reveals itself for the many layers of dynamics between its players and does so in an uplifting manner, much like the beautiful moment when Bessie and Lee witness Marvin's delight in seeing a display of light coming from a mirror Bessie is holding. It's a quiet moment, one of intense love, that shows the power of family despite the odds, and what better way to end the film with Gwen Verdon's last line? Hope is all around. Great acting performances, go see it! Estranged since their father's first stroke some 17 years earlier, Lee and Bessie lead separate lives in separate states. Lee's son, Hank, finds himself committed to a mental institution after setting fire to his mother's house. His younger brother, Charlie, seems unfazed by his brother's eccentricities or his mother's seeming disinterest. When Lee comes to the asylum to spring Hank for a week in Florida so that he can be tested as a possible bone marrow donor for Bessie, Hank is incredulous. "I didn't even know you had a sister," he says. "Remember, every Christmas, when I used to say 'Well, looks like Aunt Bessie didn't send us a card again this year?'" "Oh yeah," Hank says. Meanwhile, Marvin, the two women's bedridden father, has "been dying for the past twenty years." "He's doing it real slow so I don't miss anything," Bessie tells Dr. Wally. In Bessie's regular doctor's absence, it has fallen to Dr. Wally to inform Bessie that she has leukemia and will die without a bone marrow transplant. This precipitates the two sisters uneasy reunion. In Marvin's room, Bessie cares for her father's every need. In Lee's eyes, the sacrifice Bessie has made is too great and realizing the old man's welfare will fall to her if Bessie dies, Lee's first instinct is to look for a nursing home. "In a few month's, I'll have my cosmotology degree," she says. "My life is just coming together; I'm not going to give it all up, now!" As first Lee is tested and then the boys for the compatibility of their marrow with Bessie's, the women take stock of their lives and rediscover the meaning of "family."

- MANUGINO, Monday, July 30, 2012

2 stars

This is another movie I had to watch for a class, and now I barely remember it. All I remember is everyone loving Leo, and thinking to myself how boring the movie was.

- ajv2688, Friday, July 8, 2011

3 stars

While it is horrible story, the acting makes this movie quite entertaining. Leonardo DiCaprio, Robert De Niro and Meryl Streep gave some great performances that nearly overshadow Diane Keaton's horrible one. It was an obvious sap story that fails to produce any empathy for the character in trouble.

- ythelastman89, Sunday, November 22, 2009