Box art for Seven

Seven

thrillers


Detective William Sommerset and his new partner, Detective David Mills, are on a desperate hunt for a serial killer, who they eventually uncover, is making statements by staging his victims as tableaus of the Seven Deadly Sins.

Rotten Tomatoes® scores

  • Critic Score
    79%
  • Audience Score
    95%

common sense

PAUSE for kids age 16
Consumerism
0 out of 5
Drinking, drugs, & smoking
0 out of 5
Language
3 out of 5
Positive messages
0 out of 5
Sex
3 out of 5
Violence
4 out of 5

Grim, slick, shocking thriller. Older teens only.

what parents need to know

Parents need to know that this film contains graphic depictions of the aftermath of grisly murders involving the seven deadly sins. While none of this takes place on-screen, the vivid descriptions prove to be nearly as chilling. For example, an obese man is forced to eat until his stomach bursts. A man is forced to kill a prostitute by stabbing her reproductive organs with an 8-inch knife. A beauty queen's face is cut off. A lawyer must cut out his own stomach. A police officer's pregnant wife is beheaded. In the end, the line between good and evil is blurred, with evil more or less coming out on top.

what families can talk about

  • Families can talk about horror movies. How is this movie different than a slasher film? What makes it disturbing? Is it any less chilling because the violence is not shown on screen?

movie reviews from Rotten Tomatoes®

  • Tomatometer®

    79%
    reviews counted: 0
    see all Seven reviews
  • Audience

    95%

Audience Reviews

4 stars

The entire town is rainy and dark every moment of the day. You wake up in the morning, you open your window, you see the dark clouds floating, the sounds of people below, the racket of police cars as they are off trying to capture someone. You are a detective, and this is your last week on the job you have been slaving away at for about a good chunk of your life. You get to your final case only to have an annoying rookie detective follow you around and one of the most grotesque and disturbing death you have seen in a long while: an obese man tied up to a chair, head in a plate of rotten spaghetti, dead. His reason for his death: he committed the sin of Gluttony. And from there, we are introduced to the world of Seven (stylized as Se7en): David Fincher's second film and arguably his best. It was here that Fincher created his trademark of dark films, violent and disturbing yet graceful scenes, and shocking performances from the cast. It is hard to review this type of film because of all that it has going for it. Plus, the film-making of a high order along with the pure originality of the story. The first thing I want to touch base on is the acting of Morgan Freeman and Brad Pitt. Now, I have been something of a fan of both of their works, but here they have the most raw and revealing performances I have seen. Mainly dealing with Freeman due to him coming to terms with his life and the path he has chosen. With Pitt, I like how he embodies every young rookie out there. They are both fine actors that do a good job playing polar opposites, but what I would of liked is to see more of a backstory on Pitt's character. We know a good bit about Somerset (Freeman), but little on Mills (Pitt). I guess it is due to my love of characters, but I was a bit disappointed with the lack of backstory. This is a dark and bleak film with only a little line of light due to one character. This film is all about style, and for Fincher's second film, he delivers. However, the ending does leave one to be desired in the sense of how it is played out. Just, this film has literally everything going for it: intelligent characters, wonderful script, grotesque deaths, and magnificent direction. The ending this film needed should have been better. With that aside, this is still Fincher's masterpiece. For now...

- fb100000257973100, Sunday, December 11, 2011

4 stars

The entire town is rainy and dark every moment of the day. You wake up in the morning, you open your window, you see the dark clouds floating, the sounds of people below, the racket of police cars as they are off trying to capture someone. You are a detective, and this is your last week on the job you have been slaving away at for about a good chunk of your life. You get to your final case only to have an annoying rookie detective follow you around and one of the most grotesque and disturbing death you have seen in a long while: an obese man tied up to a chair, head in a plate of rotten spaghetti, dead. His reason for his death: he committed the sin of Gluttony. And from there, we are introduced to the world of Seven (stylized as Se7en): David Fincher's second film and arguably his best. It was here that Fincher created his trademark of dark films, violent and disturbing yet graceful scenes, and shocking performances from the cast. It is hard to review this type of film because of all that it has going for it. Plus, the film-making of a high order along with the pure originality of the story. The first thing I want to touch base on is the acting of Morgan Freeman and Brad Pitt. Now, I have been something of a fan of both of their works, but here they have the most raw and revealing performances I have seen. Mainly dealing with Freeman due to him coming to terms with his life and the path he has chosen. With Pitt, I like how he embodies every young rookie out there. They are both fine actors that do a good job playing polar opposites, but what I would of liked is to see more of a backstory on Pitt's character. We know a good bit about Somerset (Freeman), but little on Mills (Pitt). I guess it is due to my love of characters, but I was a bit disappointed with the lack of backstory. This is a dark and bleak film with only a little line of light due to one character. This film is all about style, and for Fincher's second film, he delivers. However, the ending does leave one to be desired in the sense of how it is played out. Just, this film has literally everything going for it: intelligent characters, wonderful script, grotesque deaths, and magnificent direction. The ending this film needed should have been better. With that aside, this is still Fincher's masterpiece. For now...

- fb100000257973100, Sunday, December 11, 2011

5 stars

John Doe: It seems that envy is my sin. "Let he who is without sin try to survive" Sev7n is a simply brilliant crime/detective thriller. This is the film that gave David Fincher credibility and really paved the way, for what would be a magnificent career. He has made some great films since Seven, like Fight Club and most recently The Social Network, but none touch this gritty and highly intelligent thriller. This film is more than just a great ending. The whole film is suspenseful and at times frightening. But the ending is clearly what this film is remembered most for, and for good reason. The ending of Seven is my favorite ending in any film I have seen. Number 2 is The Usual Suspects, weird that Kevin Spacey has a hand in both. The film starts off with two detectives meeting at a crime scene, one is Detective Somerset(Morgan Freeman), who is a veteran and is going to retire after the week is up; the other is Detective Mills, who is a new detective and is highly excited about his work. After the two find a obese man dead with the word Gluttony written at the crime scene, Somerset decides he wants no part of this case because he believes it to be a serial killer and he doesn't want to leave his job without finishing his last assignment. Then they find another with the word Greed written, and now Somerset knows for sure that the killer is basing his murders on The Seven Deadly Sins. Somerset decides to help Mills out on the case and it leads them on a hunt to try to find a sick twisted psycho. This film has been compared to The Silence of the Lambs, and it makes references to the film throughout. Actually I probably like this even more than Silence, which is saying a lot. The great thing that both of the films have in common is not giving too much screen time to the serial killers. In Silence, Hannibal had something like 19 minutes of screen time. In Seven, we don't see John Doe's face until the last fourth of the movie, but we feel his presence throughout. We see his body from far away as he evades the detectives. But never do we know exactly who he is. This is one of those brilliant films I have ever seen. The last act alone is one of the most chilling and smart scenes I have ever seen. I knew what to expect as soon as Freeman's character go the package. I knew what was in it, yet I watched with my eyes glued open, breathing to the rhythm of the booming score. It was magnificently executed. As brilliant as this movie is, there will always be those that can't like it. Just like Silence, it is highly disturbing and there are scenes that may be a bit too much for some. But if you're like me, these are the type of movies that are made for us. A great serial killer just can't be matched in the film world. There aren't a lot of movies that pull it off to perfection, but the ones that do like with Hannibal, like with The Joker, like with John Doe are in a whole different league of films. David Mills: I've been trying to figure something in my head, and maybe you can help me out, yeah? When a person is insane, as you clearly are, do you know that you're insane? Maybe you're just sitting around, reading "Guns and Ammo", masturbating in your own feces, do you just stop and go, "Wow! It is amazing how fucking crazy I really am!"? Yeah. Do you guys do that?

- blkbomb, Sunday, October 30, 2011