Box art for Special ID

Special ID

  • Rated R
  • HD and SD formats available

independent, special interest


Agents are turning up dead. His days are numbered. Desperate to protect his family and his life, Chen must risk everything to protect the SPECIAL IDENTITY he never wanted - before it's too late.

Rotten Tomatoes® scores

  • Critic Score
    44%
  • Audience Score
    31%

movie reviews from Rotten Tomatoes®

  • Tomatometer®

    44%
    reviews counted: 3
    see all Special ID reviews
  • Audience

    31%

Top Critic Reviews

Rotten: You know there's something wrong with a martial arts movie when the only character worth caring about is the hero's mother.

- Jeannette Catsoulis, New York Times, Thursday, March 6, 2014

Fresh: There's little suspense to speak of but plenty of roundhouse kicks to keep you shocked and awed.

- Martin Tsai, Los Angeles Times, Thursday, March 6, 2014

Fresh: Insanely dangerous stunts? Check. Obnoxious evil baddie? Check. Intricately choreographed fight sequences that are the film's raison d'tre? Check, check, check.

- Zachary Wigon, Village Voice, Tuesday, March 4, 2014

Audience Reviews

2 stars

Much in the same reign as Jackie Chan, Chow Yun-Fat and Jet Li, Donnie Yen action roles are arguably his most popular. Although when compare to the previous three most of Yen earlier starring efforts don't pack the same punch. Yen's latest sadly falls in that category whenever having to endure a muddle story before getting to the goods. Special ID is about a cop and his team of comrades going undercover in one of China's most ruthless underworld organizations to stop a gang leader. The premise and narrative beats are standard action film affairs without a change in formula; you have the undercover cop who's been on the inside for too long, undercover cop running the risk of criminals discovering his identity, protagonist not getting along with his partners, the superior officers who uses protagonist life for his own means, and by the end protagonist attempting to fulfill a personal vendetta. For a film that hardly strays away from familiar territory making sense of it all is more difficult than needed to be. Its plot is easy to understand, but distorted plot points never connected with one another in a seamless flow. A love interest for example is hardly touched upon even though scenes are entirely dedicated to hinting at it. Nothing ever becomes at the hinted romance providing moments of character development with the interaction contributing little. Another noticeable issue comes in the directionless writing. Tones drastically change on the spot from becoming a gritty action film to feeling like a rom-com at a moments notice. Characters like the plot itself are easy to understand, but the muddle story makes it needlessly difficult decipher. You'll have an understanding of the relationships, the characters, motivations, but even with a clear understanding muddle storytelling prevents any worthwhile investment to be made. This film never manages to find its own identity at the end coming off as a collection of several scripts each being drastically different each in their own muddle way. Donnie Yen is comical and naughty rascal-like acting in the film is passable, but for the emotional side of his character he doesn't cut it. A weak script is blame as Yen does his best with heartless dramatic scenes. When it comes to Yen fight choreography it appears brutal, but doesn't get across that feel of brutality. Every fight is restricted to being in a close a quarter and even when the action is taken outside of a building it plays strictly by the rules. Yen is the only actor who uses MMA techniques while the rest of his cast are kickboxers. This eliminates the tensity in fight scenes as Yen opponents have no idea how to counter his MMA and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu techniques. Even in the first few minutes of the film even though Donnie Yen literally fights crawling around the floor his opponent does not know how to counter Yen moves. The only time it mixes fighting techniques is during Yen fight with Andy On. Andy On using primarily Muay Thai and variation of several others fighting styles offered more elaborate choreography. Only when On fights against Donnie Yen do the fight scenes deliver on its brutality. Action scenes don't have the wow factor though they are well staged that provide the film the much needed energy. As for Andy On acting it's solid selling the idea he could go toe to toe with Donnie Yen. Jing Tian provides a pretty face and impresses with her agility and flexibility. Tian might be small, but her move set makes her believable and the film climactic action scene sells her in the action role. Her acting is good genuinely the often corny and cheesy dialogue sound as good as it can. Special ID delivers solid performances and solid action scenes, but in order to get to see those you have to endure the deadweight of a muddle and standard story. It plays by the rules in terms of narrative and action unable to find an identity of its own.

- juliomendez19941, Saturday, November 9, 2013

3 stars

Clarence Fok's Special ID lacks anything special.With only 95 minutes of screen time to showcase, the story, while complete, suffers from unrefined storytelling. Some of the characters don't have much explanation and the plot details come and go rather quickly; however, the film makes good use with its insertion of action.The fight pieces are made up of nicely choreographed martial arts brawls. The hits are intense and the stunt work is displayed at opportune moments. The car chase also contains a few moments of delight.Donnie Yen provides some amusement as the lead, but it's the fights that are most welcome. The lovely Tian Jing finds herself with a worthwhile character. Andy On is a good counterpart for Donnie, while Collin Chou is completely underused.Special ID has its share of moments and all in all is a watchable modern day action film.

- skactopus, Monday, April 28, 2014

3 stars

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- aquateen2, Sunday, June 15, 2014