Box art for The Blue Max

The Blue Max

action & adventure


During World War II, a young German aviator competes with his flight squadron for the coveted Blue Max flying award, and ends up falling in love with the unhappy wife of his commanding officer.

Rotten Tomatoes® scores

  • Critic Score
    N/A
  • Audience Score
    76%

movie reviews from Rotten Tomatoes®

  • Tomatometer®

    N/A
    reviews counted: 4
    see all The Blue Max reviews
  • Audience

    76%

Top Critic Reviews

Fresh:

- Carol Cling, Las Vegas Review-Journal, Thursday, June 24, 2010

Fresh:

- Emanuel Levy, EmanuelLevy.Com, Thursday, June 24, 2010

Fresh:

- Philip Martin, Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, Thursday, June 24, 2010

Audience Reviews

3 stars

One of the strongest obscure Hollywood classics out there. Unique in the fact the storyline is told from the point of view of the Germans during WWI. Interesting in that George Peppard plays his lead role brilliantly. Almost too good a movie for it's time, worth a viewing if you're a history buff or just like old-school filmmaking.

- MovieGuruDude72, Sunday, June 6, 2010

3 stars

SUMMARY: this is about a german solider that stops at literally nothing to recieve a Bllue Max, a high honored metal recieved after u kill 20 people. This is his story through all the circumstances he goes through gettin the Blue Max. POSITIVES: this has one of the best plots ive seen in a while. Its a really really good storyline and the acting was absolutely great. IMPROVEMENTS: super fake for a movie from the '60s. OVERALL: this is a really good movie, but its super fake.

- cj11sme, Friday, November 21, 2008

4 stars

Truly fantastic film, and such an unusual one: a Hollywood produced drama entirely about German pilots during WWI. It's essentially a story about ambition, jealousy, rivalry and arrogance, set in the skies of Europe in the golden age of dogfighting and aerial adventure, and with a love triangle featuring a sultry Ursula Andress thrown in for good measure! Do not pass up the opportunity to see this film. One important point: must-see in widescreen DVD due to its magnificent photography.

- billfenner1967, Monday, February 16, 2009