Box art for The Lost World: Jurassic Park

The Lost World: Jurassic Park

action & adventure, children & family, sci-fi & fantasy, thrillers


Director Steven Spielberg takes us back to the scene of Jurassic Park in The Lost World, the blockbuster sequel with even more dinosaurs, more action and more breathtaking visual effects than its record-breaking predecessor.

Rotten Tomatoes® scores

  • Critic Score
    52%
  • Audience Score
    52%

common sense

PAUSE for kids age 12
Consumerism
1 out of 5
Drinking, drugs, & smoking
1 out of 5
Language
2 out of 5
Positive messages
3 out of 5
Positive role models
4 out of 5
Sex
0 out of 5
Violence
4 out of 5

Nastier beasts and mean people in intense sequel.

what parents need to know

Parents need to know that The Lost World: Jurassic Park intends to thrill its audience with action-packed, scary, and suspenseful scenes. The film is not recommended for very young or sensitive kids. Dinosaurs, clearly motivated by a desire to protect their young and their environment, attack and often kill the humans whom they perceive as predators. Lengthy sequences of heroes in peril and animal brutality alternate with scenes that attempt to build character and relationships. Steven Spielberg shows some of the mayhem on camera (i.e., a heroic character is pulled apart by two dinos, then eaten); at other times, the director chooses to suggest the animals' savagery and plays it off camera (blood flows in water after a man is attacked). There are a few instances of mild swearing ("bastards," "s--t," "goddamn").

what families can talk about

  • Families can talk about sequels. In horror movies, the body count is higher the next time around. Why is this movie so much more gruesome than Jurassic Park?
  • What do you think of the movie's violence? Is it necessary to the story? Why or why not?
  • Is this the kind of movie that will stand the test of time, or does it already seem dated?

movie reviews from Rotten Tomatoes®

Top Critic Reviews

Rotten: Spielberg's dinos, manipulated by a small army of puppeteers, are watchable enough. But these artificial critters have little reason to be resurrected in our era, let alone on 3,300 screens over Memorial Day weekend.

- Bill Stamets, Chicago Reader, Saturday, January 1, 2000

Fresh:

- David Ansen, Newsweek, Tuesday, July 6, 2010

Fresh: Militaristic bounty hunters...intend to capture these animals, ship them to San Diego and make a profitable spectacle out of them.

- Desson Thomson, Washington Post, Saturday, January 1, 2000

Audience Reviews

3 stars

With a darker tone and no shortage of fast-paced action thrills, Spielberg's 1997 follow-up to his original dino-classic manages to be a an underrated gem that is very much worth checking out for action junkies. Personally, I am shocked at the amount of hate this sequel has gotten over the years. While far from a cinematic masterpiece, it is levels above the abominable "Jurassic Park III" and in some respects a bit of an improvement over the original. One aspect that the sequel improves upon are the characters. Although far from spectacular, they posses a lot more charisma and a bit more layers than the first batch. Ian Malcolm, who was regulated to the sidelines in the original, is given center stage and the film is all the better for it, especially given Jeff Goldblum's more dynamic portrayal. Julianne Moore and Vince Vaughn also give decent supporting performances but Pete Postlethwaite steals the show as the thrill-seeking hunter Roland Tembo (also has probably the most fascinating character arc out of all the cast). Even the dinosaurs are given more characterization than the first, especially the velociraptors and the T-rexes. It's also a plus that the dialogue and banter yield a bit more emotional meat outside of just providing clunky exposition. The visuals and action are just as spectacular as the first and Spielberg follows the "Aliens" template of giving the audience more dinosaurs. My favorite sequences include the nerve-racking breaking glass sequence and anything involving the velociraptors (tall grass sequence). As far as plot goes, it does lack some originality (it's pretty much Spielberg's big budget remake of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's "The Lost World") along with containing a few plot contrivances and ridiculous moments (Ex. velociraptor killed by gymnastics). Although to be fair, it's not like the first movie was lacking in ridiculous moments either. The closing San Diego sequence, while thrilling, did feel overall tacked on. Almost as if Spielberg desperately wanted to make a mini-Kaiju movie in the vein of Godzilla and he saw this flick as his only chance to do so. Ironically, the sequence ended up being a much better and more faithful representation of Godzilla movies than the crap-storm Roland Emmerich version that came out a year later. On a side note, John Williams provides the score once again but unfortunately the music feels phoned in and lacking in memorable ques. It doesn't end up being as moving as the first one. It's far from a masterpiece or a significant highlight in Speilberg's long and prestigious career, but it's a nice guilt-free slice of action/adventure fun nonetheless.

- fb100002384654145, Saturday, December 28, 2013

3 stars

With a darker tone and no shortage of fast-paced action thrills, Spielberg's 1997 follow-up to his original dino-classic manages to be a an underrated gem that is very much worth checking out for action junkies. Personally, I am shocked at the amount of hate this sequel has gotten over the years. While far from a cinematic masterpiece, it is levels above the abominable "Jurassic Park III" and in some respects a bit of an improvement over the original. One aspect that the sequel improves upon are the characters. Although far from spectacular, they posses a lot more charisma and a bit more layers than the first batch. Ian Malcolm, who was regulated to the sidelines in the original, is given center stage and the film is all the better for it, especially given Jeff Goldblum's more dynamic portrayal. Julianne Moore and Vince Vaughn also give decent supporting performances but Pete Postlethwaite steals the show as the thrill-seeking hunter Roland Tembo (also has probably the most fascinating character arc out of all the cast). Even the dinosaurs are given more characterization than the first, especially the velociraptors and the T-rexes. It's also a plus that the dialogue and banter yield a bit more emotional meat outside of just providing clunky exposition. The visuals and action are just as spectacular as the first and Spielberg follows the "Aliens" template of giving the audience more dinosaurs. My favorite sequences include the nerve-racking breaking glass sequence and anything involving the velociraptors (tall grass sequence). As far as plot goes, it does lack some originality (it's pretty much Spielberg's big budget remake of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's "The Lost World") along with containing a few plot contrivances and ridiculous moments (Ex. velociraptor killed by gymnastics). Although to be fair, it's not like the first movie was lacking in ridiculous moments either. The closing San Diego sequence, while thrilling, did feel overall tacked on. Almost as if Spielberg desperately wanted to make a mini-Kaiju movie in the vein of Godzilla and he saw this flick as his only chance to do so. Ironically, the sequence ended up being a much better and more faithful representation of Godzilla movies than the crap-storm Roland Emmerich version that came out a year later. On a side note, John Williams provides the score once again but unfortunately the music feels phoned in and lacking in memorable ques. It doesn't end up being as moving as the first one. It's far from a masterpiece or a significant highlight in Speilberg's long and prestigious career, but it's a nice guilt-free slice of action/adventure fun nonetheless.

- fb100002384654145, Saturday, December 28, 2013

3 stars

With a darker tone and no shortage of fast-paced action thrills, Spielberg's 1997 follow-up to his original dino-classic manages to be a an underrated gem that is very much worth checking out for action junkies. Personally, I am shocked at the amount of hate this sequel has gotten over the years. While far from a cinematic masterpiece, it is levels above the abominable "Jurassic Park III" and in some respects a bit of an improvement over the original. One aspect that the sequel improves upon are the characters. Although far from spectacular, they posses a lot more charisma and a bit more layers than the first batch. Ian Malcolm, who was regulated to the sidelines in the original, is given center stage and the film is all the better for it, especially given Jeff Goldblum's more dynamic portrayal. Julianne Moore and Vince Vaughn also give decent supporting performances but Pete Postlethwaite steals the show as the thrill-seeking hunter Roland Tembo (also has probably the most fascinating character arc out of all the cast). Even the dinosaurs are given more characterization than the first, especially the velociraptors and the T-rexes. It's also a plus that the dialogue and banter yield a bit more emotional meat outside of just providing clunky exposition. The visuals and action are just as spectacular as the first and Spielberg follows the "Aliens" template of giving the audience more dinosaurs. My favorite sequences include the nerve-racking breaking glass sequence and anything involving the velociraptors (tall grass sequence). As far as plot goes, it does lack some originality (it's pretty much Spielberg's big budget remake of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's "The Lost World") along with containing a few plot contrivances and ridiculous moments (Ex. velociraptor killed by gymnastics). Although to be fair, it's not like the first movie was lacking in ridiculous moments either. The closing San Diego sequence, while thrilling, did feel overall tacked on. Almost as if Spielberg desperately wanted to make a mini-Kaiju movie in the vein of Godzilla and he saw this flick as his only chance to do so. Ironically, the sequence ended up being a much better and more faithful representation of Godzilla movies than the crap-storm Roland Emmerich version that came out a year later. On a side note, John Williams provides the score once again but unfortunately the music feels phoned in and lacking in memorable ques. It doesn't end up being as moving as the first one. It's far from a masterpiece or a significant highlight in Speilberg's long and prestigious career, but it's a nice guilt-free slice of action/adventure fun nonetheless.

- fb100002384654145, Saturday, December 28, 2013