Box art for Tyler Perry's Meet the Browns

Tyler Perry's Meet the Browns

comedy, drama


A single mother living in inner city Chicago, Brenda has been struggling for years to make ends meet and keep her three kids off the street.

Rotten Tomatoes® scores

  • Critic Score
    32%
  • Audience Score
    70%

common sense

ON for kids age 13
Consumerism
3 out of 5
Drinking, drugs, & smoking
3 out of 5
Language
0 out of 5
Positive messages
3 out of 5
Sex
0 out of 5
Violence
3 out of 5

Feel-good film is formulaic but OK for teens+.

what parents need to know

Parents need to know that this dramedy is noticeably less raunchy than other Tyler Perry movies, while still emphasizing the standard, uplifting "work hard, don't take any shortcuts, and have faith" messages for which he's become famous. There's not much swearing, few innuendoes (and only one passionate kiss), and plenty of relatives who offer solace and support to one another. There are mentions of drug dealing, pimping/prostitution, and illegal gambling -- as well as suggestions of mild drug use -- but love, decency, and faith pretty much conquer all.

what families can talk about

  • Families can talk about Brenda's struggles as a single mom. Do you think the movie portrays her realistically? Have any parts of the movie been "Hollywood-ized"? If so, which ones?Families can also discuss why Tyler Perry is so popular. Have you seen his other movies? What do they have in common? Who are they targeted at, and why do they appeal to that audience? Do you like him better as his character Madea or as a "regular" actor? Why?

movie reviews from Rotten Tomatoes®

Top Critic Reviews

Fresh: Perry's] films are hardly realistic, but they aren't exercises in pure escapism either. They offer comic relief and moral correction. And if they feel corny and hokey at times...that is partly because they make everyone who sees them,

- A.O. Scott, New York Times, Saturday, March 22, 2008

Fresh: Unlike Diary, the drama here is buoyant enough to handle the contrast of its too-silly slapstick.

- Aaron Hillis, Village Voice, Tuesday, March 25, 2008

Rotten: On top of everything else, the direction is sloppy, the script is forced, and the whole thing feels like a bad hallmark film.

- Austin Kennedy, Sin Magazine, Thursday, June 24, 2010

Audience Reviews

2 stars

Meet the Browns is another Tyler Perry film that seems to be so dramatic that people thinks its amazing, but it was just ok for me, its got good acting and an pretty good storyline, but overall it was just an ok movie for me.

- DreamExtractor, Saturday, October 22, 2011

2 stars

Meet the Browns is another Tyler Perry film that seems to be so dramatic that people thinks its amazing, but it was just ok for me, its got good acting and an pretty good storyline, but overall it was just an ok movie for me.

- fb1526363679, Friday, December 2, 2011

1 star

Once an auteur reaches a certain plateau of unmitigated success, there comes the double-edged sword of creative freedom. While this rare privilege grants a few artists the Holy Grail of moviemaking known as final cut, it also means that they will probably not hear the word no until they tumble back down the industry ladder a la Orson Welles. For example, writer/directors George Lucas (Star Wars) and M. Night Shyamalan (Sixth Sense) never came close to realizing the high standards set by their breakthrough trilogies/movies. Both auteurs, however, followed up their landmark works with scripts that showed promise-if only they had gone through a stricter editing process. Now a one-man mogul after successes on stage, television, and screen, Tyler Perry presents audiences with a similar dilemma. Meet the Browns shows potential but the scattershot script is all over the place. In this PG-13-rated dramedy, a single mother (Bassett) rediscovers the joys of family after reconnecting with the relatives of the father she never knew. Despite the preponderance of clichs and stereotypes, audiences cannot help but respect the good-hearted charm of Perrys style. Problems arise, however, when contrivance after contrivance pops up (a coach scouting a basketball phenom in inner-city Chicago just happens to live in the same small Georgia town as the Browns) and the story becomes too cartoonish and slipshod (grandmotherly Madea shows up out of the blue in an OJ-style car chase). It then becomes hard to keep sight of such charm. But who has the gall to take a red pen to a mogul? Bottom line: Take a raincheck.

- jeffboam, Friday, August 13, 2010