Box art for VHS

VHS

  • Rated R
  • HD and SD formats available

independent, special interest


A group of misfits hired to burglarize a desolate house and acquire a rare tape are confronted with a dead body, a hub of old televisions and an endless supply of cryptic footage, each video stranger and more inexplicably terrifying than the last

Rotten Tomatoes® scores

  • Critic Score
    55%
  • Audience Score
    41%

common sense

NOT FOR KIDS 0
Consumerism
0 out of 5
Drinking, drugs, & smoking
4 out of 5
Language
5 out of 5
Positive messages
0 out of 5
Positive role models
0 out of 5
Sex
5 out of 5
Violence
4 out of 5

Spooky anthology horror film has lots of gore, sex, drugs.

what parents need to know

Parents need to know that V/H/S is a horror anthology film that's dedicated to the concept of shooting quickly and simply on home video, so almost all of the segments are shown from the point of view of a character with a camera of some sort. There's lots of graphic horror violence, with plenty of slashing, slicing, gore, and dead bodies, as well as spooky stuff. There's also some nudity (breasts, bottoms), sex, and heavy innuendo. Characters also drink heavily, snort cocaine, and smoke pot, and language is very strong, with many uses of "f--k," "s--t," and more. There will be no keeping teen horror fans away, but it's recommended for 17 and up.

what families can talk about

  • Families can talk about V/H/S' extreme violence. Is a horror movie scarier with lots of blood? What's the impact of showing so much gore?
  • How much of the sex in this movie is violent in nature? Is there any case where sex or sexual situations occur between a loving couple? What does the movie have to say about this subject?
  • In the first segment, why do the characters get so completely drunk before attempting intimacy? What message does that send?
  • Is the movie scarier because it's shown from the point of view of video cameras? How is this different from an ordinary horror movie?

movie reviews from Rotten Tomatoes®

  • Tomatometer®

    55%
    reviews counted: 20
    see all VHS reviews
  • Audience

    41%

Top Critic Reviews

Fresh: An ingenious hybrid: part Godardian art film, part abstract video experiment, part sleazy shocker, and all self-castigating interrogation of what film-theory types call the "male gaze."

- Andrew O'Hehir, Salon.com, Wednesday, October 3, 2012

Fresh: All of the short films are genuinely unnerving, and the point-of-view camerawork is, at times, startling.

- Bruce Diones, New Yorker, Monday, October 1, 2012

Rotten: I came, I saw, I hunkered.

- Christopher Orr, The Atlantic, Friday, October 5, 2012

Audience Reviews

3 stars

The thing with Found Footage films is that there's really nothing new to the genre to make it worth seeing. This film is pretty good considering all the films that have been released in the genre over the years. If you love the genre and horror in general, this is worth a watch. This film offers a new twist on traditional found footage films as this is an anthology of different horror stories, but all are presented as found footage, and it works well enough to entertain and thrill. Each story is eerie and manages to be thrilling. Acting wise, there's really nothing that stands out, and this is standard low-budget fair. The film does have its flaws, but it's definitely much more entertaining than many other films in this horror genre. If you were disappointed by films like Chernobyl Diaries and Apollo 18, then this film may surprise you. I enjoyed both Apollo 18 and Chernobyl Diaries, but I'd have to say that this film is much better for many reasons, the main one being incorporating the anthology element in the genre, which adds so much more to the film's enjoyment. V/H/S is a good horror flick and one of the most original and fun Found Footage films since Trollhunter. Every story has its imperfections, but they nonetheless deliver some solid and enjoyable entertainment that is a must see film for horror fans. There's plenty to enjoy here, and this film exceeded my expectations, and I didn't expect to like it the way I did. There's plenty of bloody and bone chilling moments to be had here, and every director does a good enough job with each story that makes up this new breed of horror anthology.

- TheDudeLebowski65, Monday, November 12, 2012

3 stars

Really on the fence about my liking of this film. The reason I'm in the middle is because it was good in the sense that it constantly had me feeling eerie (which horror films have been failing to do lately), but it was bad in the sense that the plot was sort of weak. Internally there is no connection or consistency with each character or VHS tape that's viewed. It's a descent movie at best, worth watching, but don't expect much from it.

- fb729949618, Thursday, November 1, 2012

3 stars

The found footage subgenre seems ripe for overexposure at this point. Just this year we've had a found footage party movie, a found footage superhero movie, a found footage cop movie, and this week will open Paranormal Activity 4, the latest in the popular found footage horror series. I understand the draw for Hollywood. The movies are cheap and the found footage motif plays into our culture's endless compulsion for self-documentation. There are definite benefits to the genre, notably an immediate sense of empathy, a sense of being in the fray, and an added degree of realism. There are plenty of limitations too, notably the restrictive POV and the incredulous nature of how the footage was captured. With that being said, I think the people behind V/H/S finally found a smart use of this format. V/H/S is an indie horror anthology that offers more variety, cleverness, and payoffs, than your typical found footage flick. Normally, found footage movies consist of 80 minutes of drawn out nothing for five minutes of something in the end. Usually, the payoff is not worth the ensuing drudgery of waiting for anything to happen. Watching the Paranormal Activity movies has become akin to viewing a "Where's Waldo?" book, scrutinizing the screen in wait. V/H/S has improved upon the formula by the very nature of being an anthology movie. Rather than wait 80 minutes for minimal payoff, now we only have to wait 15 minutes at most. I call that progress. I haven't seen too many found footage films that play around with the narrative structure inherit with a pre-recorded canvas. I recall Cloverfield smartly squeezing in backstory, earlier pre-recorded segments being taped over. With V/H/S, this technique is utilized once and it's just to shoehorn in some gratuitous T & A. Plus, the anthology structure allows for a greater variety. If you don't like some stories, and chances are you won't, you know another one's just around the corner. For my tastes, the stories got better as the film continued. I was not a fan of the first few stories. The wraparound segment ("Tape 51") involves a band of delinquents who are hired to retrieve one VHS tape in a creepy home. The guys are annoying jackasses, and our opening image involves them sexually assaulting a woman and recording it to sell later, so we're pretty agreeable to them being killed off one by one inside the creepy home. I just don't know why anyone would record themselves watching a movie. It's not like it's Two Girls One Cup we're talking about here. I found the wraparound segment to be too chaotic and annoying, much like the band of idiots. It ends up becoming your standard boogeyman type of story and relies on characters making stupid decision after stupid decision. Why do these idiots stay in the house and watch movies? Why do these people not turn on the lights? The first actual segment ("Amateur Night") has a solid premise: a bunch of drunken frat boys plan to make their own porn with a pair of spy glasses. They bring the wrong girl back to their motel room and get more than they bargained for. Despite some interesting commentary on the male libido (interpreting a woman's spooky actions as being sexually aroused), this segment suffers from a protracted setup. There's a solid ten minutes of boys being boys, getting drunk, that sort of thing. And when the tables are turned, the spyglasses lead to shakier recording, which is odd considering they are pinned on the guy's nose. The horror of the ending is also diminished because it's hard to make sense of what is literally happening. The weakest segment is the second one ("Second Honeymoon"), which is surprising considering it's written and directed by Ti West, a hot name in indie horror after The Innkeepers. West's segment is your standard black widow tale, following a couple on their vacation to the Southwest and their home movies. However, a stalker is secretly videotaping them while they sleep. Borrowing from Cache, this is a genuinely creepy prospect, and the sense of helplessness and dread are palpable. It's surprising then that West concludes his segment so abruptly, without further developing the stalker aspect, and tacks on a rather lame twist ending that doesn't feel well thought out. "You deleted that, right?" says one guilty character on camera washing away blood. Whoops. The second half of V/H/S is what really impressed me, finding clever ways to play upon the found footage motif and still be suspenseful. The third segment ("Tuesday the 17th") begins like your regular kids-in-the-woods slasher film. The very specific types of characters (Jock, Nerd, Cheerleader) are set for some frolicking when they come across a deranged killer. However, the slasher monster is a Predator-style invisible creature that can only be seen via the video camera. When recorded, the monster creates a glitch on screen. I think this is a genius way to cover the biggest head-scratcher in found footage horror: why are you still recording? With this segment, the video camera is the savior, the protector, the only engine with which they can see the monster. The fourth segment ("The Sick Thing That Happened to Emily When She Was Younger") is shot entirely through Skype conversations on laptops. Emily is convinced her apartment is haunted and seeks support from her boyfriend, away on business. This segment's co-writer and director, Joe Swanberg, is more known for being the mumblecore king than a horror aficionado, but the man makes scary good use of the limitations of his setup. The story might be a bit hard to follow, especially its ending, but there are some great jolts and boo-moments. There's even a fantastic gross-out surprise as Emily shares her own elective surgery/exploration. But it's the last segment that takes the cake, ending V/H/S on a fever pitch of action. The wraparound segment isn't even that, since it ends before the final segment, "10/31/1998." It's a haunted house story about a group of guys who stumble into the wrong house on the wrong night. Initially they think the human sacrifice in the attic is part of the show, but then weird things start happening like arms coming through walls and door knobs vanishing. This segment is a great example of how effective atmosphere can be aided by smart and selective special effects. When the madness hits the home, it feels just like that, and the rush to exit the house is fueled with adrenaline. You don't exactly know what will be around the next corner. The CGI effects are very effective and the lo-fi visual sensibilities give them even more punch. The frenzied chaos that ends "10/31/1998" would be apt for a feature-length found footage movie, let alone a 15-minute short. It's a satisfying climax to a film that got better as it went. With all found footage movies, there's the central leap of logic concerning who assembled this footage, for what purposes, and how they got it. With movies like the abysmal Apollo 18, I stop and think, "Why do these people assembling the footage leave so much filler?" V/H/S doesn't commit a sin worthy of ripping you out of the movie, but when it's concluded you'll stop and ponder parts of its reality that don't add up. The very idea of people still recording onto VHS tapes in the age of digital and DVD seems curious, but I'll go with it. Several segments obviously had to be recorded onto a hard drive; the Skype conversations would have to be recorded onto two perhaps. So somebody transferred digital records... onto a VHS tape? And it just so happens that this tape then got lost. While inherently hit-or-miss, V/H/S succeeds as an anthology film and generates new life into the found footage concept. Not all of the segments are scary or clever, but even during its duller moments the film has a sense of fun. There's always something new just around the corner to keep you entertained, and the various anthology segments give a ranger of horror scenarios. The lo-fi visual verisimilitude can be overdone at times, but the indie filmmakers tackle horror with DIY ingenuity. I don't know if anything on screen will give people nightmares, but it's plenty entertaining, in spots. V/H/S is an enjoyable, efficient, and entertaining little horror movie just in time for Halloween. If you're going to do a found footage movie, this is the way to do it. Nate's Grade: B

- mrbungle7821, Wednesday, October 17, 2012