Box art for What's the Matter with Kansas?

What's the Matter with Kansas?

  • Rated NR

independent, special interest


A politically active Kansas megachurch splinters, moves to an amusement park, and when that fails, a Best Western motel. Meanwhile, an idealistic farmer revives Kansas' progressive tradition, taking his message all the way to Washington, D.C.

Rotten Tomatoes® scores

  • Critic Score
    60%
  • Audience Score
    58%

credits

directed by

Joe Winston

producer

Laura Cohen

studio

independent
filmbuff

movie reviews from Rotten Tomatoes®

Top Critic Reviews

Rotten: The specific roots of a pervasive sense of disenfranchisement are barely described, as are strategies for liberals seeking to reclaim the state.

- Andy Webster, New York Times, Friday, July 30, 2010

Rotten: Funny? Scary? Entirely logical? It all depends on your point of view, of course, and What's the Matter With Kansas? isn't likely to move viewers one way or another.

- Ann Hornaday, Washington Post, Friday, March 19, 2010

Rotten: Unfocused, dry and boring. Its a squandered opportunity to extensively and compellingly tackle provocative political, social and moral issues plaguing America.

- Avi Offer, NYC Movie Guru, Friday, July 30, 2010

Audience Reviews

2 stars

Here is the thesis of the book: Republicans use social and religious issues to motivate lower income people to vote against their economic self-interest. As you can see, the thesis of the book is very interesting, and it would be good if there were a film that explored this thesis with specific examples, math, interviews with candidates, profiles of Republican supporters, liberals' work using reason and logic to convince Republican voting bases to switch their votes, and a look at the root of the political shift in the southern demographics. But this film does none of that. Instead, in the words of Kyle Smith of The New York Post, "It's condescending, it's vague, it's unfair and, ultimately, it's pointless." The film presents a few "enlightened" liberal southerners and a lot of Christian fundamentalist southerners. In the end, the film doesn't rise to the level of any political commentary, not to the degree that the book did. Overall, I was very disappointed with this film, and like most things, one would be better served by reading than watching the film.

- hunterjt13, Sunday, May 12, 2013