Box art for Wreck-It Ralph

Wreck-It Ralph

  • Rated PG
  • HD and SD formats available

anime & animation, children & family


From Walt Disney Animation Studios comes a hilarious arcade-game-hopping journey. For decades, Ralph has played the bad guy in his game. In a bold move, he goes on an action-packed adventure and tries to prove that he is a true hero with a big heart.

Rotten Tomatoes® scores

  • Critic Score
    86%
  • Audience Score
    86%

common sense

ON for kids age 7
Consumerism
2 out of 5
Drinking, drugs, & smoking
2 out of 5
Educational value
1 out of 5
Language
2 out of 5
Positive messages
4 out of 5
Sexy Stuff
1 out of 5
Positive role models
4 out of 5
Violence & scariness
3 out of 5

Game-themed movie mixes potty humor with strong messages.

what parents need to know

Parents need to know that Wreck-It Ralph brings video games to life in a way that will appeal to both kids and adults. The story is about a "bad guy" who deserts his classic arcade game to prove that he's not so bad after all, turning Disney's animated adventure into the tale of an underdog searching for a new identity. The movie is accurate in the way it presents popular games/game genres, so you can expect some action-packed scenes, especially in the parts of the movie that take place in a first-person shooter game (guns, aliens, etc.). Game characters can die, but it's only permanent if it happens outside their home game. In one scene presented comically, someone grabs a zombie's heart out of its chest. There's also a little bit of drinking and kissing -- and a fair amount of potty humor/language ("butt," "doody," etc.) -- amid the movie's deeper messages about identity, compassion, loyalty, and challenging the status quo.

what families can talk about

  • Families can talk about how Wreck-It Ralph portrays video game violence. What's realistic? What's not? What are your family's values when it comes to violence in the media?
  • What are the movie's female characters like? Do they challenge stereotypes about girls and "girly" video games? How so?
  • Talk about the ways that Ralph and Vanellope are mistreated and misunderstood. What could other characters have done to be more inclusive and more accepting?

movie reviews from Rotten Tomatoes®

  • Tomatometer®

    86%
    reviews counted: 20
    see all Wreck-It Ralph reviews
  • Audience

    86%

Top Critic Reviews

Fresh: The movie invites a measure of cynicism - which it proceeds to obliterate with a 93-minute blast of color, noise, ingenuity and fun.

- A.O. Scott, New York Times, Thursday, November 1, 2012

Fresh: It's fun for awhile, but it's not a video game you'll come back to once you set down the controller.

- Adam Graham, Detroit News, Friday, November 2, 2012

Fresh: The movie's subversive sensibility and old-school/new-school feel are a total kick.

- Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times, Friday, November 2, 2012

Audience Reviews

3 stars

This is the 52nd animated film from Disney, and it is another winner. The plot is something of a video game version of Toy Story, where video game characters come to life after the arcade is closed, and exist in a way unknown to the public. The character we follow is the titular Wreck-It Ralph, a bad guy in a game that is mainly a mix of Donkey Kong and Rampage. Ralph is tired of being seen as just a bad guy, and dreams of being respected, both in general, but also as the hero he knows he can be. Fed up with his life, he sets out to prove he's a hero after all, but his intentions might be more devastating than he realizes. I won't get into the reasons why his actions might be so troubling, because it's just more than I can to explain right now, and is part of the fun anyway. In broad strokes, the plot and the message are really nothing new, but this is a very fun and clever variation on a theme. It's mostly aimed at a younger audience, but there's some references that are directly aimed for older viewers, especially those with a gaming background. Like Who Framed Roger Rabbit, this film brings together a massive collection of characters from competing companies. Not everyone is here, but the roster they get is still pretty impressive. Unlike the aforementioned Roger Rabbit film, this one doesn't quite go far enough with the concept or do as much as they can, but even then, it's still amazing to see so many recognizable game characters interacting with one another, especially since the focus is on retro gaming, and really taps into nostalgia...even though it adds a contemporary twist. The casting is dead on, and the characters really match the likeness of those people voicing them. John C. Reilly is great as Ralph, and you really come to sympathize with him and relate to him being misunderstood. As his in-game nemesis Fix-It Felix, Jack McBrayer is solid, if predictable as the cheerful and sweetly naive goodie. The casting of Jane Lynch as the lead in a Call of Duty/Halo/Gears of War style game is likewise on the nose, but still a lot of fun. Then we get Sarah Silverman as an outcast 'glitch' in a racing game that's a cross between Candy Land and Mario Kart. The character, like the actress, can be quite annoying, but if you're into her shtick, then it's not really a problem. I really loved the concept here, and especially the clever way they establish the world building and rules that the game character must follow. It's pretty funny, and makes me wonder what it would be like if the scenario proposed here were real. The game jumping is also neat, but it's a let down that there wasn't more of it, as I thought there might be. The film is very bright, colorful, and really vibrant. It's visually delightful, and the action is crisp and fast. The slower character scenes are also good, even if they're a retread of things we've seen many times over. The film has a nice mix of heart, humor, and emotions, even if it might be a tad overkill at times, especially with the schmaltz. All in all though, I really liked it, even if it wasn't all that fresh or innovative.

- cosmo313, Friday, May 24, 2013

3 stars

This is the 52nd animated film from Disney, and it is another winner. The plot is something of a video game version of Toy Story, where video game characters come to life after the arcade is closed, and exist in a way unknown to the public. The character we follow is the titular Wreck-It Ralph, a bad guy in a game that is mainly a mix of Donkey Kong and Rampage. Ralph is tired of being seen as just a bad guy, and dreams of being respected, both in general, but also as the hero he knows he can be. Fed up with his life, he sets out to prove he's a hero after all, but his intentions might be more devastating than he realizes. I won't get into the reasons why his actions might be so troubling, because it's just more than I can to explain right now, and is part of the fun anyway. In broad strokes, the plot and the message are really nothing new, but this is a very fun and clever variation on a theme. It's mostly aimed at a younger audience, but there's some references that are directly aimed for older viewers, especially those with a gaming background. Like Who Framed Roger Rabbit, this film brings together a massive collection of characters from competing companies. Not everyone is here, but the roster they get is still pretty impressive. Unlike the aforementioned Roger Rabbit film, this one doesn't quite go far enough with the concept or do as much as they can, but even then, it's still amazing to see so many recognizable game characters interacting with one another, especially since the focus is on retro gaming, and really taps into nostalgia...even though it adds a contemporary twist. The casting is dead on, and the characters really match the likeness of those people voicing them. John C. Reilly is great as Ralph, and you really come to sympathize with him and relate to him being misunderstood. As his in-game nemesis Fix-It Felix, Jack McBrayer is solid, if predictable as the cheerful and sweetly naive goodie. The casting of Jane Lynch as the lead in a Call of Duty/Halo/Gears of War style game is likewise on the nose, but still a lot of fun. Then we get Sarah Silverman as an outcast 'glitch' in a racing game that's a cross between Candy Land and Mario Kart. The character, like the actress, can be quite annoying, but if you're into her shtick, then it's not really a problem. I really loved the concept here, and especially the clever way they establish the world building and rules that the game character must follow. It's pretty funny, and makes me wonder what it would be like if the scenario proposed here were real. The game jumping is also neat, but it's a let down that there wasn't more of it, as I thought there might be. The film is very bright, colorful, and really vibrant. It's visually delightful, and the action is crisp and fast. The slower character scenes are also good, even if they're a retread of things we've seen many times over. The film has a nice mix of heart, humor, and emotions, even if it might be a tad overkill at times, especially with the schmaltz. All in all though, I really liked it, even if it wasn't all that fresh or innovative.

- cosmo313, Friday, May 24, 2013

4 stars

Fun, Loud and Colorful for kids and fans of classic videogames.

- YosemiteSamFan, Saturday, March 30, 2013