Extras

Extras

  • Rated TVMA
  • 3 seasons

comedy

Once in a great while, a man really has a chance to shine. Andy Millman is not that man. From the creators of 'The Office', Ricky Gervais and Stephen Merchant, comes this comedy series about a nondescript Englishman who quits his job to become an actor.

season 3

  • 1 episode

Emmy(R) Award-winner Ricky Gervais is back as Andy Millman--a once-hapless extra who has become a sitcom star--in the special finale of the acclaimed HBO comedy series.


episode 1: Extras: The Extra Special Series Finale (60 minutes)

Emmy(R) Award-winner Ricky Gervais is back as Andy Millman--a once-hapless extra who has become a sitcom star--in the special finale of the acclaimed HBO comedy series.


common sense

PAUSE for kids age 15
Consumerism
0 out of 5
Drinking, drugs, & smoking
3 out of 5
Language
4 out of 5
Positive messages
0 out of 5
Sex
3 out of 5
Violence
0 out of 5

Office mate mines showbiz for laughs.

what parents need to know

Parents need to know that this British series comes from the folks behind the original version of The Office. And although this show's setting and characters are very different, the general flavor of the humor remains the same, relying on awkward pauses and mortifying faux pas for laughs. Main character Andy is often selfish and self-serving, and issues like racism and physical disability are used for joke fodder (which mature folks will understand as ironic, but which the younger set may misinterpret). Characters swear casually and frequently (though this is no Deadwood), drink and smoke, and talk about sex (though very little of the latter is actually shown). Recognizable Hollywood stars guest-star as themselves, gleefully mocking their public personas.

what families can talk about

  • Families can talk about whether they find this kind of purposely cringe-inducing humor funny. What's the point of this kind of comedy? Is it more realistic/telling than traditional sitcom humor? How is this series like The Office? How is it different? Why do you think the guest stars wanted to participate? Do you think the show's versions of these people are any more accurate than their "regular" public personas? Also, is it OK to do and say things that are generally considered offensive in the name of comedy? When would you say TV writers have crossed the line? Is that line different for cable and network shows? Should it be?